New Video: The Oldest, Most Distant Object in the Universe Discovered

gnaistgnaist Stanford, CA, USAPosts: 4,831 Admin
New SciShow video up! Hank reports on the discovery by NASA scientists of the most distant, oldest galaxy ever observed.

I found this episode really fascinating! I always wondered how NASA could see objects in space that are so far away from Earth. And to find something that was formed near the beginning of the universe? Mind blowing!

Thanks @Hank for an awesome episode of SciShow! (Of course, they're all awesome!)
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Comments

  • PyroTimeLadyPyroTimeLady Posts: 10
    It's too bad that NASA was de-funded.  Space is one of the most fascinating things that humans can look into (literally and figuratively :D)
    ~Don't tell me I'm not from Gallifrey!~
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  • BrickBrick Posts: 36 ✭✭

    It's too bad that NASA was de-funded.  Space is one of the most fascinating things that humans can look into (literally and figuratively :D)
    I really hope that it becomes more privatized though now! Because corporations have money and then the government wont need to fund NASA anymore, even though they should be giving the 3 trillion to NASA instead of the stupid war.
  • TzviTzvi New JerseyPosts: 961 ✭✭✭✭
    @gnaist ; I never understood how they can measure how old stars/galaxies are? Or how they can determine the distance of said space constellations - how accurate is their dating system?
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  • missMorticiamissMorticia Posts: 49 ✭✭
    Tzvi said:
    @gnaist ; I never understood how they can measure how old stars/galaxies are? Or how they can determine the distance of said space constellations - how accurate is their dating system?
    In the next 50 years or so they'll be updating that process anyways!
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  • FrostyManFrostyMan Posts: 11
    Tzvi said:
    @gnaist ; I never understood how they can measure how old stars/galaxies are? Or how they can determine the distance of said space constellations - how accurate is their dating system?
    From what I understand, it's measured by the distance of the galaxy from the earth in light-years. For extremely distant objects, like ones 13 billion light-years away, they must have existed that far into the past in order for us to be seeing them. (I think.)
  • MichkovMichkov Posts: 105 ✭✭
    For stars you look at the spectrum and size of the star to determine its age. The spectrum gives you its composition, the oldest stars have only Hydrogen and Helium in them, younger ones have other stuff. The size of the star says something about its lifespan, so you wont find any blue giants which are very old because they burn out pretty quick.

    As for galaxies as Frosty said the light needs time to get to us so they objects have to have been there in the past. The farther you look out into the universe the farther you look back into the past until you get to the microwave background showing the aftermath of the big bang.
    Further as the universe expands objects get dragged along, so they appear to move away from us adding a Dopplershift effect to the photons coming to us. The farther out the object is the more pronounced is the redshift. So this effect is another way to measure the distance/age of an object.
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