Aspiring writers, authors and poets. UNITE!

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  • LappisLizzieLappisLizzie Moscow IDPosts: 61
    Hello, I am writing two novels at the moment, one is about a group of 10 people ages 18-25 living in a cost-co during the zombie apocalypse. The other I am working one is bast on one of my dreams i have almost every night, the story is about a princess who is tortured every day by her father because another kingdom killed the girl he loved and forced him the marry the girls mother. I have also written a children's story about a sad, friendless duck, that becomes friends with a chick that hides behind the cat tales. I have also started another story, I'm only about a paragraph in, but it's about an alien that came down to earth and is studying the acts of middle school kids by pretending to be a shy girl who sits in the corner and watches every one.
  • givemejackbarakatgivemejackbarakat Dalllas, TXPosts: 7
    I'm aspiring to be a writer. I can't really think of anything else to do with my life. When school starts I think it will be easier because I will learn more things and be forced to write. At the same time, I am going to be a lot busier so it  will be harder to write stories I have planned :(
  • JMFilipowiczJMFilipowicz Posts: 38
    I'm an author with one book out (cover is my avatar). I aspire to have people actually buy it. So far it seems everyone that has picked it up is someone I have personally talked to.  Hard to become JK Rowling that way...lol. 
    J M Filipowicz author of Wardroids.
  • figgyfanfiggyfan PennsylvaniaPosts: 15
    I have this really bad habit of thinking of stories, starting them and then leaving them to dry with the excuse that I will come back to it later on when I have the inspiration >.> I now have a few short stories and way more than a few novel-ish type ideas that I haven't attempted to write in a little over a year, but I can't bring myself to discontinue them forever and always XD I have written quite a lot of poetry though XD One of my goals is to h
    "I will not stop. For mad I may be, but I will never be convenient." ~ Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly
  • InkhandInkhand Colorado (via the interwebs)Posts: 50 ✭✭
    I'm a writer myself, with one book published (as an ebook) and another in the works. Like @JMFilipowicz getting people to buy my book seems to be harder than actually writing it. 
    I'm a writer. Sometimes I write things. You can see those things here: www.markasargent.com

    DFTBA

  • mjs2013mjs2013 South DakotaPosts: 3
    I'm a writer, but I've only shown my stuff to friends or family. I'm hoping to start a blog soon to show off some of my writing.  I like to write in many different genres and experimenting in different styles. Although fiction is my favorite, I do appreciate poetry. Especially after taking a poetry class last spring. 
  • oceanpotionoceanpotion EnglandPosts: 347 ✭✭✭
    I love writing but can never seem to find the time. I have loads of i deas but but always end up starting a new story/poem when i'm halfway through.

  • BethbethBethbeth Posts: 5

    I haven't had much experience either, but I love writing and it has become a tradition for to write everyday at the train station on my way home.

    Personally, I just write whatever I like and I think that's the great thing about writing. Just imagining your way through lives.

  • if anyone would be ever so kind to read my intro and tell me if it's any good


    AND GRAMMAR ISSUES PLEASE TELL ME I WILL NOT BE OFFENDED

    DFTBA
  • MarcellaMarcella Yeah The NetherlandsPosts: 1,378 ✭✭✭
    I love writing, I've been doing it since forever. Participated in NaNoWriMo for the first time this year, and I reached 50K on the 25th. I'm kind of proud of myself.. :P

    if anyone would be ever so kind to read my intro and tell me if it's any good


    AND GRAMMAR ISSUES PLEASE TELL ME I WILL NOT BE OFFENDED

    I read your thing, and it's really good. I really liked it. Very original so far, good job :)
    In the second paragraph it says "our parents and our past doesn't", but I think that's supposed to say "don't".
    Will you be posting the rest of this story on that website too? I'd like to read it! :)
    "If the kids don't believe, make them believe."

    - Alex Gaskarth
  • Luke_Earl_MolleLuke_Earl_Molle Earl of Peace Jefferson, IaPosts: 3,008 ✭✭✭✭
    I am actually working on 3 books right now, which is a terrible idea. One of the novels has been completely stagnant since mid-summer, one novel is kind of getting to the major points and it is getting hard to write because I am scared I will mess up. The third is actually a book of thoughts and sometimes it gets pretty stagnant and it has very few things put in to it. I love to write poetry, it is probably my biggest passion. One of my favorite ways to write is somebody tells me what they need written, like they need a seen about death, and then I right a seen about death for them. If somebody can give me a topic, I can write about it with such a high amount of passion, and when I write with passion, I write good. So if anybody has a seen in a book they need help with, tell me about it and I can write it, if you get published I wouldn't even need to be acknowledged, though it would be kind of nice.
    I am the Duke of Earl, and I also am Earl For To and Of Peace
  • Luke_Earl_MolleLuke_Earl_Molle Earl of Peace Jefferson, IaPosts: 3,008 ✭✭✭✭
    I love writing but can never seem to find the time. I have loads of i deas but but always end up starting a new story/poem when i'm halfway through.
    I do the same thing, if somebody gives me an idea I can write about it for a couple hours, then I draw a blank about it
    I am the Duke of Earl, and I also am Earl For To and Of Peace
  • BrizeBrize Posts: 11
    Having an idea for something is quite obviously fantastic, but I feel obliged to make the point that it is all about the finished product and how you actually write it. I'm sure we've all read simple little stories about potentially unimportant things. Some of them were probably horrible, either way to simplistic and two dimensional or entirely over our heads overloading readers with unnecessary information.

    Pay attention to the point you're trying to make, the changes you're paying attention to, what really matters and embellish the project accordingly. You could have an incredibly interesting plot and character development, but how what's going to happen happened is important unless it intentionally isn't.

    As for writer's block, not having enough time, and taking on too many ideas at once, breathing helps. As does doing things. Let the ideas come to you and jot them down when it is available to do so. If your brain is over thinking its goal, you're more than likely to psyche yourself out and shut down due to the uncomfortable and disastrous pressure of potential failure. Which, when it comes to your creation, and your creation's creative process can't possibly happen until you decide it is a final product.

    I have stacks and boxes of notebooks I began writing something in and then got distracted or embarrassed or just drew a blank about. And I always tell myself I'll make it back to revising them. Eventually I will. We all will, whether or not something serious becomes of them or it doesn't. Writing constantly helps though, as much as you can. If you have to start a new idea everyday or every other day, so what? Maybe someday the plots will all connect, or a set of poems develop the same feel.

    "To the pull of midnight wanderings I give up my restrain. I release my heart to your iron grasp and greet welcome to the rain." -Pi Cee
  • Luke_Earl_MolleLuke_Earl_Molle Earl of Peace Jefferson, IaPosts: 3,008 ✭✭✭✭
    Brize said:
    Having an idea for something is quite obviously fantastic, but I feel obliged to make the point that it is all about the finished product and how you actually write it. I'm sure we've all read simple little stories about potentially unimportant things. Some of them were probably horrible, either way to simplistic and two dimensional or entirely over our heads overloading readers with unnecessary information.

    Pay attention to the point you're trying to make, the changes you're paying attention to, what really matters and embellish the project accordingly. You could have an incredibly interesting plot and character development, but how what's going to happen happened is important unless it intentionally isn't.

    As for writer's block, not having enough time, and taking on too many ideas at once, breathing helps. As does doing things. Let the ideas come to you and jot them down when it is available to do so. If your brain is over thinking its goal, you're more than likely to psyche yourself out and shut down due to the uncomfortable and disastrous pressure of potential failure. Which, when it comes to your creation, and your creation's creative process can't possibly happen until you decide it is a final product.

    I have stacks and boxes of notebooks I began writing something in and then got distracted or embarrassed or just drew a blank about. And I always tell myself I'll make it back to revising them. Eventually I will. We all will, whether or not something serious becomes of them or it doesn't. Writing constantly helps though, as much as you can. If you have to start a new idea everyday or every other day, so what? Maybe someday the plots will all connect, or a set of poems develop the same feel.

    that makes a lot of sence
    I am the Duke of Earl, and I also am Earl For To and Of Peace
  • BH622BH622 BaltimorePosts: 128 ✭✭
    I'm a writer in than from time to time, I sit at a keyboard and put lots of words on a page. Until recently, I have failed to finish anything serious that I start, with the exception of short story assignments for classes I took in undergrad. I had a similar issue to what many people here have said: I would write one scene, but then lose track of the greater inspiration and be left with a handful of pieces that don't fit together. 

    That is, however, until I received the best writing advice I've ever been given.

    "You can't just write when you have inspiration. You need to force that inspiration to work for you." -My Friend Who Shall Remain Nameless

    Much along the lines of what Brize said, what this boiled down to was that the best way to overcome this idea of incompleteness, or not having anything more than that one scene in your head, or one idea or theme or motif or what have you, is to do something related to your project every day, ideally at the same time each day. I had never gotten more than maybe 10 pages into anything I'd written ever. This summer, however, for about two weeks straight I got up at 8 am, made breakfast, and was writing for two hours straight every single day. Some days were better than others, but that structure made it so much easier to get into the groove. By the end I was writing 1500 words per day in that 2 hours.

    I slacked off once I had to go back to work, but am sitting on roughly 30k words of my story, with a goal of 80k, and the more I work at it the more ideas come up. I wrote 2600 words on the trip back from Thanksgiving, and in the process found a way to tie everything I'd already done and everything I planned to do into a coherent and twisted scheme, something I hadn't done yet. 

    And that friend of mine has written 1.5 novel-length stories, though he's trashing the complete one for a redo upon realizing DO NOT WRITE YOUR GIRLFRIEND'S OC INTO YOUR STORY JUST BECAUSE YOU CAN.

    Seriously. 30% of his story was completely irrelevant to the plot and character development of the protagonist because he decided his character and her mary sue should fall in love. Don't do that.
    “This is how you do it: you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until its done. It's that easy, and that hard.” - Neil Gaiman on writing

    Like martial arts? Like reading blogs about it? Not sure? Check out my brand new blog, A Warrior's Journey.
  • eder_logan870eder_logan870 Indianapolis, INPosts: 3
    I love to write as well! My biggest issue seems to be that I get ideas at the most inopportune times. For example, today. The end of Dead week and the beginning of Finals week. I've been writing more now that most of this past semester though, because I have to force myself to take a break from studying. I usually write sci-fi or fantasy, but for some reason I keep getting pulled into the real of realistic fiction. I don't know why, because it usually isn't what I enjoy to read...
  • I know I love to write. Both of my parents are supportive of literature and have raised me to appreciate fine writing from an early age. I've written little short stories and stuff, and my friends and family think that they're really good. but I don't know what I could write about in a professional job. I would like to try fantasy or sci fi, but it's difficult to think of an interesting and creative topic. I'm in a bit of a pickle. :/
    There is no darkness as dark as great light corrupted.
  • Tip: Try to avoid using certain words over and over. I still have a lot of my early journals, and I used "he said" or "she said" in my dialogue WAY to often. Avoid starting sentences the same way repeatedly. Once again, I consulted my old journals to help me with my writing. Every sentence began with "the" or "my" if it was in first person. Don't worry about p.o.v. too much, and fix it to be all first or third person later, unless you want to be all Avant garde with a second person perspective.


    Actually, you kind of get a free pass on "he/she said" in dialogue, at least in my opinion. When you use that device consistently in dialogue, it kind of becomes invisible to the reader and helps the dialogue flow more easily. That said, if you're writing a long conversation, you don't need to label who said what once you've established who is speaking.
    that's understandable, but it's not exactly pleasurable to read a story that's so overflowing with the same words when trying to get a sense of the plot through dialogue. it can become distracting. 
    There is no darkness as dark as great light corrupted.
  • I love to write as well! My biggest issue seems to be that I get ideas at the most inopportune times. For example, today. The end of Dead week and the beginning of Finals week. I've been writing more now that most of this past semester though, because I have to force myself to take a break from studying. I usually write sci-fi or fantasy, but for some reason I keep getting pulled into the real of realistic fiction. I don't know why, because it usually isn't what I enjoy to read...
    I totally understand figuring out excellent ways to write a sentence or thinking of a perfect plot at moments when you need to be doing something else! :) For me, it's usually at a time when I have no paper or something, and then I end up forgetting good ideas.:(
    There is no darkness as dark as great light corrupted.
  • DooWeeOoh50DooWeeOoh50 Posts: 8
    Hello! *waves* I'm writing a Science Fiction story that has a lot to do with war, but I'm not that good at writing scenarios like that, so if you could drop some in the comments that would be awesome! 
  • BH622BH622 BaltimorePosts: 128 ✭✭
    edited December 2013
    Hello! *waves* I'm writing a Science Fiction story that has a lot to do with war, but I'm not that good at writing scenarios like that, so if you could drop some in the comments that would be awesome! 
    Holy Carp, that's vague! I guess my first comment would be to say that 'a lot to do with war' is nearly as ambiguous a sentence that you could have.

    ELABORATION: The following is just one single trail of though that qualifies as 'a lot about war' but is entirely made up as I'm going by asking clarifying questions and responding in affirmation. I will then backtrack and pick one of my clarifying questions to build a new string of points. This is done with a realistic fiction perspective because neither you nor myself has the time for how complicated that would make it.

    Are you discussing the literal details of combat and how the events unfold?
    If so, are you discussing how the small scale skirmishes evolve and the experience of living through them?
    If so, are you going to be focusing on present conditions of warfare with high technology and IEDs and and night vision and drones?
    If so, are you using these to try and establish the implications of our technology being used to increase our ability to more efficiently kill each other?
    If so, are your opinions going to be in favor or against?

    Now, let's change one of the answers. Line 2, for this example, and all the answers are yes.
    No, you've decided to discuss the political side of war and how decisions are made.
    Are you going to use a modern setting?
    Are you going to focus only on the united states?
    Are you going to focus on the President and his decision making policies?
    Are you going to focus on hypothetical situations as opposed to dramatizing current events?

    Do you see my point? 'War' is such a large topic that the best thing for you to do is to figure out WHAT you want to say about your topic. I've found in my own endeavors that the more I know about the non-detail oriented aspects, the more readily I am able to write actual scenes. Additional evidence for my argument for more specific clarification, Star Trek has as much 'to do with war' as Doctor Who, yet they are clearly different in structure, presentation, perspective, and even their attitude on combat and conflict, and the topic or setting or implications of war are far more forefront and overt in the overall design of Star Trek than Doctor Who, yet one of the key defining characteristics of Doctor Who (The 50th bring it up even more so). I hope this helps you at least move forward with your planning.

    Also, in response to people having ideas at inopportune moments, Robert Frost came up with a solution to that one. He carries a small notebook with him at all times, and would stop to jot down ideas whenever he had them. Yeah, it can be a little harder with prose than poetry due to volume, but we live in the glorious age of smartphones. Download a notepad app, and BAM! you have a thing you carry with you at all times with which to record your thoughts whenever they occur.

    Also, I am a writer in heavy need of an editor, so I apologize for inevitable typos.
    by BH622
    “This is how you do it: you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until its done. It's that easy, and that hard.” - Neil Gaiman on writing

    Like martial arts? Like reading blogs about it? Not sure? Check out my brand new blog, A Warrior's Journey.
  • KathyTrithardtKathyTrithardt Victoria, BCPosts: 18
    I finally completed a NaNoWriMo without getting bored of my project, so that was nice. I'm thinking of self publishing through Createspace. I ordered a proof the other day, just to see something I wrote in actual book form.
    When I don't discard my writing, it ends up at theonlykathytrithardt.wordpress.com.
  • Lavache_BeadsmanLavache_Beadsman New YorkPosts: 661 ✭✭✭
    I'm always curious about people's influences, so I thought I'd take the opportunity to revive this thread by asking all my fellow writers and poets on Nerdfighteria whom they consider their influences to be. What are the books and who are the authors that have had the most profound effect on your work so far?

    To start, I think reading The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen is a big part of why I wanted to be a writer in the first place. Something about the ethos and the way that book was written really spoke to me. Also, David Foster Wallace's Brief Interviews With Hideous Men is pretty much solely responsible for sparking my interest in short fiction. I also think Zadie Smith and Saul Bellow have both had a pretty huge impact on me.

    What about you guys?
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,902 ✭✭✭
    I finally completed a NaNoWriMo without getting bored of my project, so that was nice. I'm thinking of self publishing through Createspace. I ordered a proof the other day, just to see something I wrote in actual book form.
    From little things, big things grow. 
    I did NaNoWriMo and the link is in the doobly-doo below.

    The second book I'm working on is far more ambitious and rambling. Just the scratchy outline in an exercise book a was 63 pages long. I think that I'll have something the size of Ulysees by the time I've finished.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,902 ✭✭✭
    I'm always curious about people's influences, so I thought I'd take the opportunity to revive this thread by asking all my fellow writers and poets on Nerdfighteria whom they consider their influences to be. What are the books and who are the authors that have had the most profound effect on your work so far?
    The authors which have had the most profound impact on me are George Orwell and Leo Tolstoy. However, the books that I have the most of are Agatha Christie, PD James, Erle Stanley Gardner and Raymond Chandler. 
    The really screwy thing is that what I end up producing is far more rambly and makes it look like I've read lots of Dickens.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • Lavache_BeadsmanLavache_Beadsman New YorkPosts: 661 ✭✭✭
    @Rollo Well, Tolstoy can be rambly sometimes, so that makes some sense.
  • mikexcelsiormikexcelsior Posts: 1
    Well hello there aspiring writers and poets of nerdfighteria, like everyone else here, I am an aspiring writer and poet (among other things)... so I guess I'm in good company? 
  • JadeReadsYAJadeReadsYA Posts: 12
    I am currently struggling to save a plot that's gone sour half-way through. I'm still in school, so at the moment it's just an aspiration of mine, but I would love to, at some point and hopefully in the near future, write and publish my fiction. I have so many plots-gone-sour on my computer documents, most of which I would love to save, but lack the time...

    I think my only tip is not to edit. Write the story, and only when you've finished your first draft should you edit. This is just from my personal experience, but if I edit while I'm still writing, I only want to edit, lose my train of thought, and then my piece goes sour. But I am not even near being a pro, so that is only a suggestion that seems to help me.
    ~Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.
  • nerdycatlover516nerdycatlover516 Green BayPosts: 7
    I love writing. I want to write a dystopia, and I write all the time.
    Cats act like gods, but when you are in tears they are right by your side purring. When you have a cat, you don't have to go to a movie theater, all the entertainment you need is right at home.
  • icantevenicanteven Posts: 32
    I've always enjoyed writing, but before anything else, it's really a therapeutic practice. That usually makes it easier for me to write my first draft because I don't have to worry about what anyone else will think. Then when I go back and edit I look for clarity, theme, plot, character motivation, and all that good stuff. I'm working on a butchered fairy tale right now and it's really fun to just tear all the fairy tale stereotypes to shreds. I wish you all the best on your work!
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