What is the best book that you had to read for school?

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  • KinnyKinny Hula Paradise Posts: 233 ✭✭
    Books: The catcher in the rye, Leaves of Grass, The curious case of the dog at midnight, Que me queres amor? (Galician novel that I think it is translated into English. Very recommendable) Short stories: Shiloh, The Yellow Wallpaper, The revolt of Mother, Everyday use
  • BH622BH622 BaltimorePosts: 128 ✭✭
    I had to read Watchmen for a class in both high school and college. Also in college, I had to read Demian, which I actually thoroughly enjoyed.
    “This is how you do it: you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until its done. It's that easy, and that hard.” - Neil Gaiman on writing

    Like martial arts? Like reading blogs about it? Not sure? Check out my brand new blog, A Warrior's Journey.
  • RialVestroRialVestro Posts: 6,346 ✭✭✭
    Watchmen? Did you just say Watchmen? Back when I was in school that wouldn't even be considered a "real book", they'd call it a comic and tell you to put it away during class.
    Ni, peng, nee-wom! Ecky, ecky, ecky, pakang, zoom-ping! Baa weep grahna weep ninny bong!
  • When I was in 5th or 6th grade we had to read Percy Jackson: Lightening Thief and I nerded out bc I went through a phase where I all but worshipped that series and everything else I've had to read for school (so far) hasn't surpassed it. 
    "The world is not a wish-granting factory." -TFiOS
  • JustinSwanJustinSwan Posts: 165 ✭✭✭
    For AP English Lit we had to read Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible over the summer. It's one of my top three favorite books of all time.
    “But I will say this: When the scientists of the future show up at my house with robot eyes and they tell me to try them on, I will tell the scientists to screw off, because I do not want to see a world without him.” 
    ― John GreenThe Fault in Our Stars
  • litwitlitwit Posts: 2
    The Giver.. Hands down one of my absolute favorites.
    I read this book in the 7th grade and absolutely loved it. It inspired me to read the other 3 books in the series, and I don't think I had ever been that motivated to read before!
  • constantlyalliconstantlyalli The land of endless winterPosts: 3
    Luckily enough, my freshman year, we had a classics choice reading assignment that let me experience some wonderful books; one of my favorites comes from that assignment. The other was a choice-of-two assignment vs. Huck Finn, which I couldn't pull myself through because grammar.

    East of Eden {Steinbeck} isn't necessarily my favorite book so far as I'm emotionally attached to it, but it's one of the most personally powerful books I've read. Even to this day, I still remember so much that I learned or considered while reading it, and even though it did get a bit long, it was such an interesting story that I had to keep reading. Lots of material for the analysis form, as well, so that was nice. 

    Pride and Prejudice {Austen} was delightful. I don't usually enjoy pure romance books, but this one had enough to keep me interested. The character development of Darcy and the contradiction to what I believed his main personality traits to be as opposed to Elizabeth's was certainly something I enjoyed discussing with my friend, who was even crazier about it than I was. Suprisingly, though, I wasn't the biggest fan of Elizabeth. However, both movie-Elizabeth and vlog-Elizabeth made me much happier than book-Elizabeth. 
    The best play I had to read (and yes, there were several) would have to be The Crucible. I'm a sucker for a crazy female character.
    So. very. crazy. We just finished the film version this week (Yes, I'm in an English class in which the teacher PREFERS to teach a book by the movie instead of, y'know, reading. :| ) and dear goodness, I just about cried out of frustration as Abigail got worse and worse. 
  • Luke_Earl_MolleLuke_Earl_Molle Earl of Peace Jefferson, IaPosts: 3,008 ✭✭✭✭
    So far I would say the best one is Ironman by Chris Crutcher. I also really like To Kill a Mockingbird. Last year I read Mississippi Trial and Tangerine, they were both really good, even though I was the only kid with that opinion. If I had to organize it in a list I guess that list would be something like this:

    1. Ironman Chris Crutcher
    2. Tangerine (I can't remember who wrote it)
    3. To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee
    4. Mississippi Trial (can't remember this one either)
    5. Race For the Sky (can't remember who wrote this one either wow) (it is about the Wright brothers)

    I am the Duke of Earl, and I also am Earl For To and Of Peace
  • deltartdeltart Posts: 5
    1984. I think everyone in my English class all agreed that it was "messed up", but in the sense that the book probably showcases the ultimate form of dystopia.
  • CassieAstraeaCassieAstraea London, UKPosts: 100
    Defo Of Mice and Men. I think you actually gained something from the close reading. Also, I love that book.
  • Follydust321Follydust321 Posts: 30
    Most of my favorites are books I read on my own, but I can think of a few books I really enjoyed during my education. I can't pick just one!

    Elementary School: Bridge to Terabithia and Tuck Everlasting. Reading these books was one of the first times I thought about death and my own immortality. They definitely changed by world view as a child. 

    Middle School: Most of the books we had to read in middle school were pretty mediocre, but I do remember really loving one short story called "All Summer in a Day" by Ray Bradbury. Has anyone else read that? We read it out loud, and I distinctly remember a few of us crying when we read it. 

    High School: I loved almost every book I read in high school, but my favorites were probably Lord of The Files, Tess of d'Urbervilles, The Catcher in the Rye, and The Awakening.

    College: Fountain and Tomb. 
  • justhazeljusthazel The Middle of Nowhere, Isle of ManPosts: 3
    The one book that I've thoroughly loved is Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen. Each paragraph is phrased well with details that the reader can easily pick up on. From my experience, this book is generally fun to read. 
  • ohsy999ohsy999 Posts: 1
    So far, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian. We get to read it out loud, too, which is freaking awesome. Next year we get to read Lord of the Flies which is another amazing book. 
  • WitchmojoWitchmojo South West EnglandPosts: 14
    Digging through the ancient and crumbling manuscripts from my school days in the 70's I remember reading Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw and suddenly realising it was where the musical film 'My Fair Lady' came from. I actually really enjoyed it, although I have never re-read it.
  • I haven't read many books for school, but definitely  The Outsiders
  • aeryn_of_earthaeryn_of_earth Posts: 57 ✭✭
    edited June 2014
    In chronological order:

    In middle school (junior high?) we read the Wizard of Earthsea, but I didn't know how amazing it was until I re-read it later in life.  I still count it.  Also read Z for Zachariah and Kit's Wilderness, which were both amazing.

    In high school I missed out on a lot of the "usual" books people read in high school because I went to a weird school, but I read The Things We Carried and Fahrenheit 451, both of which were world-shaping.

    In college I read so many books, but the best was probably Break, Blow, Burn, by Camille Paglia, which is a compendium of poetry excellently explained, and also Indignation, by Philip Roth.

    I don't know how many excellent books I neglected to give the time of day they were worth when I was younger, because I always LOATHED being told what to read as a youngster.  If I was supposed to be reading it for school, I was immediately disinterested.  My advice to younger nerdfighters is not to miss out on the opportunities you're given.
    by aeryn_of_earth
    Little fly,                             Am I not                        For I dance
    Thy summer's play               A fly like thee?              And drink and sing                  --William Blake
    My thoughtless hand            Or art thou not               Til some blind hand                  Song of Experience
    Has brushed away.                A man like me?               Shall brush my wing.                "The Fly"
  • RialVestroRialVestro Posts: 6,346 ✭✭✭
    In high school I missed out on a lot of the "usual" books people read in high school because I went to a weird school, but I read The Things We Carried and Fahrenheit 451, both of which were world-shaping.
    I always thought Fahrenheit 451 was a usual book to read in high school though I never actually read it. I've always heard about it and the controversy behind it but I've never even seen that book anywhere. The weird thing is I know that it's a controversial book but I don't actually know why it's so controversial. It was banned in a lot of schools several years ago and that ban still stands in some schools but most have lifted the ban by now and actually made it required reading. Given that I've never even seen a physical copy of the book I'm assuming I live in one of those areas where the ban is still in effect.
    Ni, peng, nee-wom! Ecky, ecky, ecky, pakang, zoom-ping! Baa weep grahna weep ninny bong!
  • aeryn_of_earthaeryn_of_earth Posts: 57 ✭✭
    In high school I missed out on a lot of the "usual" books people read in high school because I went to a weird school, but I read The Things We Carried and Fahrenheit 451, both of which were world-shaping.
    I always thought Fahrenheit 451 was a usual book to read in high school though I never actually read it. I've always heard about it and the controversy behind it but I've never even seen that book anywhere. The weird thing is I know that it's a controversial book but I don't actually know why it's so controversial. It was banned in a lot of schools several years ago and that ban still stands in some schools but most have lifted the ban by now and actually made it required reading. Given that I've never even seen a physical copy of the book I'm assuming I live in one of those areas where the ban is still in effect.
    Very possibly.  Where-ish do you live?  The banning of Fahrenheit 451 is particularly ironic, since the crippling effect of censorship and the human quest to gain knowledge even when it's restricted are some of the central themes of the book.  Some religious communities have banned it for the depiction of burning a Bible.  I find it odd, though, that in 2014 there would still be places where you couldn't find this book at all.  If you can, I highly recommend you get your hands on it -- through the internet, perhaps?  It's a seminal piece of literature well worthy of the vigorous debate surrounding it.

    As for it being a common high school book, perhaps, though I don't think it's as frequently read as some others.  I also chose to read it for school when we were asked to pick a book, rather than having it assigned.
    Little fly,                             Am I not                        For I dance
    Thy summer's play               A fly like thee?              And drink and sing                  --William Blake
    My thoughtless hand            Or art thou not               Til some blind hand                  Song of Experience
    Has brushed away.                A man like me?               Shall brush my wing.                "The Fly"
  • JamieRJJamieRJ Posts: 5
    The best book I had to read for school has to be animal farm by George Orwell for those of you who haven't heard of either the book or author it's not a kids story like the title leads you to believe it's a rather dark but accurate description of how in theory communism works but the theory fails to take human greed into account which was the crucial flaw in Stalin's Soviet Union. It uses a group of animals that take over a farm from the farmer to prove animals can run it for themselves where everyone is equal but the leaders, the pigs, become blind with power and end up being just as corrupt as the human farmer that they overthrew in the first place. I read it in third year and it made me think a lot more as I've grown it taught me to question what people tell me instead of following blind. It's a truly insperational book and an amazing read which I strongly recommend to anyone and everyone but especially those with an open mind :)
  • RialVestroRialVestro Posts: 6,346 ✭✭✭
    JamieRJ said:
    it taught me to question what people tell me instead of following blind.
    I actually learned that from a very young age. I was told by parents and teachers to always question anything I didn't understand. My mom is a Jehovah's Witness so we had a lady come over and read the Bible every week. Being taught to question anything I didn't understand lead to me questioning a lot of passages in the bible and not getting any answers. This is actually how I ended up being an Atheist. My dad is an Atheist too so I was never forced to study the Bible. At least not on days when he was home. But when it was only my mom, there was a lot of pressure on my brother and I to learn the Bible. (My older brother having a learning disability meant that he would basically just sit and listen as he couldn't read yet.) I don't think the ladies appreciated me questioning the word of God as we probably went threw 3 or 4 different teachers before I finally started just hiding in my room when they would come over. (Though one of them actually passed away as I vaguely remember attending her funeral.)
    Ni, peng, nee-wom! Ecky, ecky, ecky, pakang, zoom-ping! Baa weep grahna weep ninny bong!
  • BluegrassBluegrass DenverPosts: 9
    My absolute favorite book from school was The Lord of the Flies.  I loved the imagery and the interpretations of basic humanity.  I've read through this book seven different times over the past six years and I find some new depth to it every time.  I do have to say that The Giver, Anthem, and A Midsummer Night's Dream were not far behind.  I enjoyed the books we read in school more than most of my classmates.

    “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” ~Anne Frank

  • RialVestroRialVestro Posts: 6,346 ✭✭✭
    edited July 2014
    Bluegrass said:
    My absolute favorite book from school was The Lord of the Flies.  I loved the imagery and the interpretations of basic humanity.  I've read through this book seven different times over the past six years and I find some new depth to it every time.  I do have to say that The Giver, Anthem, and A Midsummer Night's Dream were not far behind.  I enjoyed the books we read in school more than most of my classmates.
    1. You know a book, or anything really, is good when you can revisit it and find new things to enjoy about it every time. I really enjoy that more than revisiting something only to find myself wandering why I ever liked it.

    2. Midsummer Night's Dream isn't technically a book. It's a script for a play by William Shakespeare. I find it surprising how many plays have made it into this thread. I was taught in beginning drama that a script is an unfinished work of art that is meant to be seen not to be read.

    There are some times many different interpretations of books but you can only really experience your own while reading it. A play however you can experience the interpretations of several different people threw the visions of different directors and the performances of different actors. You can see a play several times and it's never going to be the same experience twice.
    by RialVestro
    Ni, peng, nee-wom! Ecky, ecky, ecky, pakang, zoom-ping! Baa weep grahna weep ninny bong!
  • c_cubedc_cubed Posts: 13
    To Kill a Mockingbird! I don't know if I even put that book down!
  • nikitoniumnikitonium Toronto, ONPosts: 5
    Definitely The Hobbit, and the first LOTR movie came out shortly after we finished the book so... field trip! I also enjoyed The Chrysalids and The Giver. When I got to university I majored in English and really loved The Picture of Dorian Grey I read for my Victorian Lit class. 
  • WilskaWilska Adelaide, AustraliaPosts: 43 ✭✭
    The best play we looked at was The Crucible but the best book had to be One Flee Over the Cuckoo's Nest. That was an enthralling book that dealt with a lot of issues and I think everyone should read it. Classic.
  • Disney_FanDisney_Fan Posts: 9
    edited July 2014
    The best book I had to read for school would be Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. The best part of it all is the interview with the author at the end of the book (especially when he discusses about censorship). It's like a "behind the scenes" within the book. Best part of the actual book... hmm.. It was ironic that most of Mr. Bradbury's imaginative technology was invented. Clarisse represents innocence from my point of view. Mildred's friend's reaction to the passage that Guy Montag read out loud was.. astonishing. You forget the power authors have to bring out emotions. (note: It reminded me of The Giver in which people want to reject emotions because they can hurt.) Fahrenheit 451 reveals the importance of books: they contain knowledge. Knowledge is always a benefit because it's power. In this case, remembering (certain) books is to build a city, a society again... but a better way. So I guess you may say it's like the end of the Dark Age, but within the future.

    p.s. Now to talk about The Giver, I can't wait to see it premiere in the theaters!
    ----
    ..I just realized that I posted this through a comment. Sorry, "Wilska"! I meant this as my own post, but your post it great too. The Crucible is great too!
    by Disney_Fan
  • The best book I read for school was probably 'Owls Do Cry' by Janet Frame, in my final year of English. Most people in the class didn't enjoy reading it at all, myself included at the time, because the writing style was quite difficult in places and got figurative to the point of being downright confusing so it definitely required rereading to really 'get' what was going on, but it was a fantastic book to write essays on and has stayed with me. David Mitchell's 'Black Swan Green' which we studied the year before was also pretty good - I left wanting to read more books by both authors, although I haven't managed to as yet.
  • jupiterrocks24jupiterrocks24 Amestris, of course!Posts: 26
    In elementary school we had to read a lot of Roald Dahl, which I absolutely loved. He understands children so well, and makes all of his stories deliciously entertaining. He is, to this day, my favorite children's author.

    In middle school, my 7th grade English teacher made me read both Night by Ellie Wiesel and Animal Farm by George Orwell, which I loved reading. 

    In high school, I read Jane Eyre, Mansfield Park, and Julius Cesar, among others. My mother made me read Emma by Jane Austen with her, so I would understand 19th century literature, and while I loathed it for a while, by the end it had become my favorite book and sowed the seed for my favorite movie, Clueless

    "Now I see. You're jealous. You're jealous of humans aren't you? According to you, humans are supposed to be a lot weaker than homunculi. And yet, even if they get discouraged after being beaten, and even if they get close to falling down after losing their paths, they continue to get up and fight. Everyone around them helps them get back up. And you're envious of that."

    ~Edward Elric, Fullmetal Alchemist

  • KritikalKritikal Boise, IdahoPosts: 250 ✭✭
    My favorite book I read in school is probably To Kill a Mockingbird. To this date I have read it 3 times, and will probably read it again sometime.

    I'm super excited for this year of English. We are reading Hamlet, Camus' The Stranger, and Kafka's The Metamorphosis. All three are among my favorite books.

    I also read my first Vonnegut book for a school project (Player Piano). Although it was the weakest Vonnegut I have read so far, it started a beautiful addiction fueled by irony, gallows humor, and epitaphs.
    I don't want the world, I just want your half.
  • HistoryNerdHistoryNerd Posts: 7
    The Great Gatsby.
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