Crash Course: Literature

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  • KTmckelvKTmckelv Posts: 4
    I'm very excited, especially because I think I might be the only Nerdfighter who has yet to read the Great Gatsby. I keep meaning to, but there are so many other books just sitting there waiting to be read. I'll probably buy it on the nook I just got though :)
    You should! It's amazing! :)
  • geekacrossthestreetgeekacrossthestreet Posts: 166 ✭✭✭
    It's a spectacular book to be sure. I just wonder what other books he'll have on the list. Does anybody want him to include something of his own?
  • BelisariusBelisarius Posts: 314 ✭✭✭
    @edward They'll be uploaded on Thursday. And the Romeo & Juliet one hasn't been uploaded yet - this week was a 'special surprise', i.e. the bloopers from the world history course. So keep your eyes peeled on the 29th for Romeo & Juliet!
  • Can't wait for this series! It's going to be incredible. Also, very useful: I'm studying Romeo and Juliet in my English Lit class, so it is perfect timing for me, hehe :D 
    "I'm afraid so. You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret: all the best people are."  
  • MaelwysMaelwys Posts: 6
    Am I the only one that hoped, when he opened the secret compartment, that the "star crossed lovers" within would be Bald John Green and Other John Green? ;-)
  • wessellswessells Posts: 69
    Yes, well, I didn't hope that. I really liked to see Hazel and Augustus there.
    It was a very nice episode, I thought, it taught me much more then I normally did from the history course.
  • DanicaDanica IndernapolisPosts: 17 ✭✭
    Maelwys said:
    Am I the only one that hoped, when he opened the secret compartment, that the "star crossed lovers" within would be Bald John Green and Other John Green? ;-)

    Yep- that would have been great. Awesome suggestion. Downside: would take time we don't have available to do intro, subtext of their epic romance. Upside: their stars are aligned!
  • PygmiPygmi Posts: 7
    edited December 2012
    I read nerd fighter book club... you had me at book club. Though I must admit I've already ready a couple of the books that John was talking about. Definitely read Romeo and Juliet and had to "gangsta" it up for a kid in class that didn't understand what was going on in it. But I will say I'm kind of excited for the Great Gatsby. 
    by Pygmi
  • CellistPondCellistPond Posts: 340 ✭✭✭
    I only just started watching Crash Course cause of the Lit. 
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  • noklunoklu Posts: 1
    So I like this series; I like what John brings to the table and his method of analysis. However, earlier in this thread there were some rumblings about the "anglophone resistance to literature in translation". It might be said, knowing what texts he shall be covering (R+J, Gatsby, Catcher, and Dickinson) that it is even less in scope than that: three out of four texts are American and the fourth is Shakespeare, who is rather universal and common. 

    Now, it is also understandable that Crash Course may very well consider that its primary audience is American and therefore focuses on what is known to them. However, I would argue that precisely because the American education system and literary circles are inwardly focused (this is a generalisation; there are no doubt countervailing but specific examples), there is room to introduce famed novels, plays, and poetry from other countries. They need not be unknown; there are the famous Russian novelists (Dostoevsky, Tolstoy), the French (every single existentialist ever :P ), Germans (Herman Hesse), and from the East, famous Chinese and Japanese poets. The great Irish writers (Beckett, Joyce [likely Dubliners only, everything else is understandably too mammoth sized]). Australians. Canadians: Margaret Atwood and Ondaatje in recent times. 

    Having said that, I understand three of the selection choices: R+J as the representative Shakespeare that relates to young people, who are the primary audience; Gatsby, because John loves it; Catcher, because it is such a famous novel and also relevant to young adults. I don't know why Dickinson because I don't know which poems will be covered. 

    I'm going to enjoy the series; I haven't extensively studied Gatsby or Catcher; all the works are quality works (possible exception of some of Em's poems). I just believe that there was an opportunity here to expose people to works from outside the Anglosphere (yes, I know some of the nationalities I earlier quoted are in the Anglosphere).
  • amandafinlawamandafinlaw Posts: 49
    KTmckelv said:
    I'm very excited, especially because I think I might be the only Nerdfighter who has yet to read the Great Gatsby. I keep meaning to, but there are so many other books just sitting there waiting to be read. I'll probably buy it on the nook I just got though :)
    You should! It's amazing! :)
    I bought it and read the first chapter :) I like it so far. The language is really nice.
  • randomradiationrandomradiation SingaporePosts: 392 ✭✭✭
    I really want him to discuss "The Picture of Dorian Gray".
    I love that book! It's one of my favorite books I've ever read that's not a Harry Potter book. I re-read it whenever there's a lag in books that I'm reading, which doesn't happen often, but whatever. I think I've read it three or four times by now. Do you like it?
    Yes, I absolutely loved it. I only read it once, because a guy I had a crush on said it was his favorite book. I despised Dorian, but somehow that made the story in its entirety better. :)
    Oscar Wilde's works are truly remarkable. 
    Please @ me if you want to say something to me! | Instigator of the Last Ones | I live in the Land of the Last Ones

    "When the scientists of the future show up at my house with robot eyes and they tell me to try them on, I will tell the scientists to screw off, because I do not want to see a world without him."    -Isaac, The Fault in Our Stars, John Green 
  • leediana0311leediana0311 Posts: 89 ✭✭
    @amandafinlaw I thought so too! I FINALLY got to reading 'The Great Gatsby' because of CrashCourse and I'm so glad I did. :). Fitzgerald is a wonderful writer. :)
     Haec credam a deo pio? A deo iusto? A deo scito? Cruciatus in crucem! Tuus in terra servus nuntius fui officium perfeci. Cruciatus in crucem. Eas in crucem! You get Hoynes!
  • mirndamirnda Posts: 142 ✭✭✭
    I also finally read Gatsby because of Crash Course! And now I'm going to read Catcher in the Rye. Sad that I couldn't motivate myself to read these books in high school, but now I really want to because of Youtube <<
  • LucyisaliveLucyisalive Posts: 68 ✭✭
    I actually really wish he could carry on with Crash Course Literature and do some other great book or even poetry?

    'To love another person is to see the face of God' - Les Miserablés 

    'There's some good in this world... and it's worth fighting for' - The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers.  

    'This is why I love books... they jump into the abyss to be with you.' - John Green

  • geekacrossthestreetgeekacrossthestreet Posts: 166 ✭✭✭
    There should definitely be a Crash Course Poetry.
  • ArielAriel Posts: 146 ✭✭✭
    Maelwys said:
    Am I the only one that hoped, when he opened the secret compartment, that the "star crossed lovers" within would be Bald John Green and Other John Green? ;-)

    I didn't want that when it happened, but now I wish it had.
  • Now it's over and I'm sad. I loved Crash Course Literature. :( I had only read Romeo&Juliet before and (from a German point of view) it was nice to read American books and have them analyzed. I hope there will be another Literature mini-series in the future. Crash Course Poetry would be awesome, too!
  • geekacrossthestreetgeekacrossthestreet Posts: 166 ✭✭✭
    I'm sorry that it ended. I really loved it. I can't wait for the American History one!
  • I loved this mini series. I wished it was longer. John Green, if you see this, please consider making another Literature course (Literature 2.0) or more specialized episodes (like petrarchian poetry or post-war novel or post-modernist prose or classical greek plays or... you get the idea). Please...  [-O<

    I don't want to talk to you no more, you empty headed animal food trough wiper. I fart in your general direction. Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries!

    - French soldier 

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  • AnishaDhirAnishaDhir Posts: 3
    I'm desperate for john to do more novels in the literature section on crash course ahhhh
  • NillieNillie Posts: 888 ✭✭✭
    What do you think of The Odyssey so far? How much of it have you read by now? 
    I'm about halfway through book ix, and it's great! I particularly love the fast-growing friendship between Telemachus and Pisistratus.
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,904 ✭✭✭
    edited February 2014
    I've finished it now.
    I'm a bit sick of the phrase rhododaktylos Eos now though. I think it means rose-fingered. /:)

    Also, there's an over abundance of eating whole animals and hanging around places for weeks drinking mixed wine... it's not really an arduous odyssey is it? Except for the fighting, and the shipwrecks and the fact that Poseidon is a bit of a bum.
    by Rollo
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • NillieNillie Posts: 888 ✭✭✭
    @Rollo, in the English translation I'm reading, the phrase "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared..." is always used about mornings. Eos is the goddess of dawn, though, so it makes sense that the original Greek uses the name instead.
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,904 ✭✭✭
    Eos is also sometimes depicted as wearing a golden robe. That must be when she's higher in the sky or something.

    Also: 
    Penelope devises a contest to shoot an arrow through 12 axe heads. It seems like she knows that the stranger is Odysseus but then seems genuinely shocked and doesn't believe that it's him; even after he goes super-saiyan and destroys the suitors by the sword. 

    I'd hate to be the moving company to move their furniture. Their bed seems rather hard to move :D

    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • NillieNillie Posts: 888 ✭✭✭
    Some beds are physically impossible to move without tearing the room itself apart. As children, my cousins had a "bunk bed", but separate rooms, because the wall between their rooms was constructed so that the beds were part of the wall. I suppose the marriage bed in this epos is of a similar kind.
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,904 ✭✭✭
    I don't know if every copy of Slaughterhouse Five contains pictures but the one I was reading did. I kind of want to say that they're out of place but given that the whole book is about being out of place and time and is very disjointed, they're probably as deliberate as anything else in there.

    Given that this book spends a great deal of time talking about the horrors of war, I'm kind of disturbed at the fact that it seems to be trivialising itself. So much about this work, including the "matter of fact" way in which short sentences are treated with a sense of fatalism, makes me want to think that this book is just plain dumb. But that's the point I think, that war itself is also dumb.
    For that reason, I think that Slaughterhouse Five fails in its attempts to define itself; therefore fails as a work.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,904 ✭✭✭
    Oooh ooh ohh!

    Starting on BBC Radio 4 from Monday 24th March 2014, will be a production of Hamlet.
    Shakespeare's plays are meant to be performed; so even if you can't get to a theatre, listening to it on the radio is always a good idea.
    And for listeners outside the UK, most BBC Radio programs aren't geoblocked (except live sport).

    I LOVE YOU LICENCE PAYERS!
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
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