Breaking Silence

GoonwuffGoonwuff Grahamstown, South AfricaPosts: 9
I don't know if this is an error, but there appear to be no discussions in this forum, and that seems strange to me, so... HELLO, How-to-Adulters from a wide-eyed apparently-adult. Thank you for being awesome.
"We have such a little life, but we still read Aristotle and Plato." - Dr Margot Beard

Comments

  • 13LivesSoLittleTime13LivesSoLittleTime Good ol' KentuckyPosts: 3
    Hello adult world?
  • AlekzAlekz Posts: 2
    Lol, it appears How-To-Adult is not very popular amongst the other nerdfighters on the forum. 
    Business-y type stuff and weekly vlogs! And other cool stuff too!

    My channel is HERE


  • Maybe users could start posting episodes here and discussing them? 
  • DoctorNekoDoctorNeko Posts: 17 ✭✭
    I'm not entirely happy with most of the episodes. Not that they aren't good videos, but most of the things talked about either don't apply to me (because I'm not from the US ) or I already know. For example I have had a bank account since I was six, an electronic cash card since I started secondary school. Taxes work differently in every country, job interviews and résumés are different as well, especially for me as a future teacher as we are civil servants and we get assigned :/

    I like the idea of How to Adult, the video about de-cluttering and procrastination were interesting, but most do nothing for me. 
  • deeleelambbaadeeleelambbaa Fredericksburg, VAPosts: 15
    I think even though a lot of Hank's strategies for staying productive do not directly help me stay productive, it is still super interesting to learn how others stay productive! 
    I'm also a future teacher, and I think this is especially important for us to learn because we need to know how 150 (this is how many students approximately I will have in the U.S.; not sure how many the average is for your country?) others stay productive through out the day or year. We have to help our students stay on task-- staying on task ourselves is a given! 
    "She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain."
    -Louisa May Alcott
  • DoctorNekoDoctorNeko Posts: 17 ✭✭
    150-200 is about roughly the amount of students you have each year. 
    The latest video with productivity tips was definitely good. I really liked Hank's tip to pick things that you can't back out of. This does apply to teaching. I cannot back out and say I won't grade the tests or prepare my lessons. If I have to do sth and I have to do it until a certain deadline, I will get it done. 

  • deeleelambbaadeeleelambbaa Fredericksburg, VAPosts: 15
    Yes, definitely only assign work that you will actually look at/grade/comment on/annotate/collect data from! Busy work was always my biggest pet peeve as a student, as I'm sure everyone would agree. 
    I have a policy I'm thinking about enacting in my classroom: Every time I miss my own deadline set for when I plan to hand back graded work, then the students gain one more forgiveness for late work. 
    Late work is the bane of the American school system existence-- if the student has a terrible grade, then it is the teacher's fault. Ways to fix this? Either offer EC, or forgive late work. 
    Did the How to Adult videos mention deadline forgiveness? I can't remember.
    "She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain."
    -Louisa May Alcott
  • DoctorNekoDoctorNeko Posts: 17 ✭✭
    I don't think it did. Most German schools (at least the ones I went to and had my teachers training at) have a system that works something like this: if you forget your homework you get until the next lesson to do it, if you don't you get a zero and if you do, no problem. But most homework isn't graded. You either did or you did not. Sometimes an essay will be collected but the teachers mostly just walk around and check who has it. It's then compared together so everyone has the chance to ask questions and correct their own homework. If you see that you had most questions wrong, you should maybe get help. 
    I would go crazy if I had to collect all homework, correct it and then hand it back. Is that what you do?
    Also test are highly regulated. How many big tests you are allowed to write (mostly only one a day) and other smaller tests like a pop quiz can be in every subject but should not be done every week. Otherwise students think they only need to learn for the tests, the trick is apparently to test the students in class without them noticing and then they get an oral grade for their class work which in some subjects is over 50% of your grade. 
    Not only good for the kids but also for the teachers :D



  • deeleelambbaadeeleelambbaa Fredericksburg, VAPosts: 15
    I do grade all homework! At least, I try to. I at least comment a little bit on everyone's, mostly encouraging them to ask for additional help in certain areas of commonality that I'm noticing that they're struggling in. Most American teachers don't do this, though. We're not all masochistic. 
    Every school I've been in have a minimum number of grades required in the grade book per 9 weeks, usually 15 or 20 grades. This is a lot for only 9 weeks! So ya, homework is usually an unfortunate percentage of the grades, which causes excellently achieving students to get B's and C's because they just don't do their homework. 
    My students would revolt if I gave a pop quiz ever! There would be anarchy, I'd be tied to chair and tortured. Pop quizzes are just not a thing, and big tests are also rare, aside from government-required testing and AP/IB testing to get college credit.

    Another thing about How to Adult is that they suggest different apps and methods for managing money, but money management is so rarely at the top of my priority-list when money is not a struggle. They should discuss more about investment/ savings accounts, rather than saying categories for money-spending are: 1. bills 2. free to spend.
    "She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain."
    -Louisa May Alcott
  • MyNameIsEricMyNameIsEric Posts: 20
    I'm kinda new to nerdfighteria-in fact this is my first ever post- but I would like to go on the record and state that I am a huge fan of How To Adult. I understand how its helpfulness could be some what limited to someone who does not live in America, but as a 17 year old American I have found it extremely useful. My parents are extremely lacking when it comes to a lot of topics such as how to set up a bank acount, or how to get financial aid for college-which as you can imagine is extremely important for someone of my age group- so the fact that this website exists is insanly helpful. But furthermore I think that it represents a unpresidented opportunity to further educating people around the world, in school we are taught about Greek literature (which I am a huge fan of btw), world history (by far my favorite class in high school), and how to do complex forms of math (i am truly horrible at math), but for the most part we are not taught how to complete activities that are important to day to day adult life. What Is the point of knowing enough to be successful if you don't know how to do things such as pay taxes and do your laundry?

    To be clear I am not trying to take anything away from the values that so many of is nerdfighters hold dear. I love nothing more than the pursuit of knowledge and extermination of world suck, but there are in fact basic skills that every person needs and I personally belive that How To Adult is a valuble tool for young- and even full grown- adults to use to improve their quality of life and understanding of the world around them.

    My apology if this post seems like a mindless rant with no clear message, I was just trying to get my thoughts about the matter all out. Also sorry for any mistakes I made spelling and grammar wise, I am far from perfect.

    Have a good day, and dftba!
    -Eric
  • lala_7dipitilala_7dipiti OhioPosts: 3
    I liked the how to adult videos. I am a full fledged adult that still doesn't know how to adult most of the time. I muddle through. Which means that now I have two adult children that are still giving me lessons on how to adult.
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