Are you religious?

ElrondtheGreyElrondtheGrey Fort Collins, ColoradoPosts: 31
edited December 2014 in Politics & Current Events
I'd just like to get a statistic on the Nerdfighter community as to how many people are religious

Are you religious? 89 votes

Yes
26% 24 votes
No
52% 47 votes
Sort of; undecided
20% 18 votes
«13

Comments

  • LibertyNerd25LibertyNerd25 Western United States Posts: 357 ✭✭✭
    Yes, I am a Catholic.
    We should strive for a society where all men, women, and children have access to what they need to live with dignity. Jobs, living wages, access to a good education, and so on. Only then can we call ourselves humane and just.


  • Lavache_BeadsmanLavache_Beadsman New YorkPosts: 661 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014
    I don't believe in any of the theology, but as a Jew, I think it's incredibly difficult to be an atheist, or to disavow my heritage. Throughout history, the Jews have been, as Sartre says "overdetermined from the inside." I think Jewish people have a certain duty to stand up and be accounted for, to stick together and partake in certain traditions if only in defiance of all the attempts to exterminate us.
    by Lavache_Beadsman
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,886 ✭✭✭
    To derail the question: how many people are religious? All of them. (see Horse 1128)

    To not derail the question: I am a Christian. 
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • romy16romy16 The Netherlands Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭
    Well I was raised in a Catholic family, went to Catholic schools and I go to church once a year, on Christmas eve. But besides that you can't really say I'm religious. 

    I don't pray, I don't visit church that much (except that one time a year and some funerals and weddings), I do believe in most of the values of Christianity like: treat your neighbours as you like to be treated.  But some of those values I find kinda weird and I don't agree with them. (mainly the once about homosexuals and a lot more stuff

  • Lavache_BeadsmanLavache_Beadsman New YorkPosts: 661 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014
    Rollo said:
    To derail the question: how many people are religious? All of them. (see Horse 1128)

    To not derail the question: I am a Christian. 

    Not a huge fan of this argument. Atheism is a negative proposition, or as formal logic would have it, ~G. You'd still need to add another letter to make a belief. And even if you insist on calling atheism a belief, it hardly seems religious. You can't ritualize non-worship. It is by definition not worshipping, and an atheistic proposition is just that; it offers no alternative.
    by Lavache_Beadsman
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,886 ✭✭✭
    It is by definition not worshipping, and an atheistic proposition is just that; it offers no alternative.
    I'd define worship as an act of religious devotion; that's a different concept. Ritual is also a different concept.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • Lavache_BeadsmanLavache_Beadsman New YorkPosts: 661 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014
    Rollo said:
    It is by definition not worshipping, and an atheistic proposition is just that; it offers no alternative.
    I'd define worship as an act of religious devotion; that's a different concept. Ritual is also a different concept.

    Well yes, most organized religions that I know of oblige their congregations to participate in ritualized worship, for instance in the form of prayer. Do I really need to convince you that this is so? Was this an objection to what I said?
    by Lavache_Beadsman
  • clausitclausit EnglandPosts: 7,809 ✭✭✭✭
    Y'all know we have a thread for debating if athieism counts as a religion or not, right?
    You will come to a place where the streets are not marked. Some windows are lighted but mostly they're darked. A place you could sprain both your elbow and chin. Do you dare to stay out? Do you dare to go in? How much can you lose? How much can you win?
  • Lavache_BeadsmanLavache_Beadsman New YorkPosts: 661 ✭✭✭
    clausit said:
    Y'all know we have a thread for debating if athieism counts as a religion or not, right?
    That thread to which you're referring is quite old, and anyway, the question came up in a different context on this thread. Nonetheless, I apologize for any personal distress the repetition has caused you.
  • clausitclausit EnglandPosts: 7,809 ✭✭✭✭
    clausit said:
    Y'all know we have a thread for debating if athieism counts as a religion or not, right?
    That thread to which you're referring is quite old, and anyway, the question came up in a different context on this thread. Nonetheless, I apologize for any personal distress the repetition has caused you.
    Apology duly noted, though it won't help the years of therapy I will need to deal with that distress.
    You will come to a place where the streets are not marked. Some windows are lighted but mostly they're darked. A place you could sprain both your elbow and chin. Do you dare to stay out? Do you dare to go in? How much can you lose? How much can you win?
  • cookiefiendcookiefiend Posts: 114 ✭✭✭
    edited January 2015
    My religion has put me in touch with a community of people who love each other genuinely, who support each other in all things, and who offer that same unconditional welcome to everyone who wants it. It's a beautiful idea and a beautiful community, and makes me proud to call myself a Christian! The rituals and traditions have helped me heal from a trauma history a mile long, and has done the same for many in my congregation. My community marches at Pride events, has been a healing home for many defrocked clergy, and makes significant effort to increase their understanding of the transgender community around us. Our pastor confronts the liturgical texts from an academic perspective, and constantly challenges us to be better at what he calls "radical hospitality". We regularly host Buddhist monks when they come to town for events, and partner with our local Jewish temple on social justice issues. Christians get a bad reputation because so often it's the radical right-wing conservatives who opine the loudest, but they definitely don't represent us all, not remotely!
    by cookiefiend
    In masks outrageous and austere the years go by in single file; but none has merited my fear, and none has quite escaped my smile.
  • Nope, I've been an atheist for most of my life. Don't have much more to say than that.
  • KritikalKritikal Boise, IdahoPosts: 250 ✭✭
    I'm religious no longer. I understand where the values of religion are, and I can respect that, but it wasn't for me. It's been kinda a long struggle to get out, but here I am!
    I don't want the world, I just want your half.
  • Jsf8957Jsf8957 MichiganPosts: 9
    I myself am an atheist. I was raised Christian, my family attended a Methodist Church, but I began questioning religion around the age of 13 or 14. I can't say exactly when I stopped believing since I'm not sure I ever really did, but by the time I graduated high school I definitely considered myself an atheist rather than an agnostic. Both of my parents still consider themselves religious, though they don't care much for dogma and are more interested in the mystical and spiritual nature of religion. I have an older brother and a younger sister who, as far as I can tell, are either atheist or agnostic. We are definitely all free-thinkers regardless of the different directions that it has lead us.

    Similarly to Kritikal, I have a lot of respect for what religion CAN be for other people (like cookiefiend) who find a community of like-minded, warm, caring, compassionate people. On the flip side though, it scares the s**t out me what else religion CAN also become when it's radicalized (Westboro Baptist Church or al-Qaeda for instance). Obviously non-religious groups can have their ideologies twisted to terrible ends as well, it just seems to me that religious zealotry is especially dangerous because they believe that what they are doing is God's will, and that can't be reasoned with.
  • ElrondtheGreyElrondtheGrey Fort Collins, ColoradoPosts: 31
    My religion has put me in touch with a community of people who love each other genuinely, who support each other in all things, and who offer that same unconditional welcome to everyone who wants it. It's a beautiful idea and a beautiful community, and makes me proud to call myself a Christian! The rituals and traditions have helped me heal from a trauma history a mile long, and has done the same for many in my congregation. My community marches at Pride events, has been a healing home for many defrocked clergy, and makes significant effort to increase their understanding of the transgender community around us. Our pastor confronts the liturgical texts from an academic perspective, and constantly challenges us to be better at what he calls "radical hospitality". We regularly host Buddhist monks when they come to town for events, and partner with our local Jewish temple on social justice issues. Christians get a bad reputation because so often it's the radical right-wing conservatives who opine the loudest, but they definitely don't represent us all, not remotely!
    I could not agree with you more. Christians really do get a bad rep for the radical right-wings who frequently are Christian. In reality, not all Christians are like that, a lot of us are quite progressive in our ideals. Many christians, including John Green, are in fact embracing of political issues such as gay marriage and realize that religion shouldn't be brought into such issues
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,886 ✭✭✭
    Many christians, including John Green, are in fact embracing of political issues such as gay marriage and realize that religion shouldn't be brought into such issues
    Why? (And this again shows why I think that everyone has religion)

    Through the exercise of his faith (which is pretty well much the working definition of religion), William Wilberforce harassed parliament, became an MP and head the campaign which abolished the slave trade in the British Empire with the Slave Trade Act of 1807 and eventually the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
    It is Christians in Australia who are most involved in trying to end Australia's inhumane asylum seeker policies of offshore detention.

    Are you saying that Christians in particular should not speak about political issues? If religion shouldn't be brought into such issues, are you saying that the opinions of the "irreligious" are more valuable? If so, please tell me why William Wilberforce was wrong to act upon his faith.

    I would prefer to have all faiths speaking into the political dialogue than deny or have people withdraw from the discussion. I think that a plurality of views better represents society, which is the very point of democracy.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • clausitclausit EnglandPosts: 7,809 ✭✭✭✭

    Rollo said:
    Many christians, including John Green, are in fact embracing of political issues such as gay marriage and realize that religion shouldn't be brought into such issues
    Why? (And this again shows why I think that everyone has religion)

    Through the exercise of his faith (which is pretty well much the working definition of religion), William Wilberforce harassed parliament, became an MP and head the campaign which abolished the slave trade in the British Empire with the Slave Trade Act of 1807 and eventually the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.
    It is Christians in Australia who are most involved in trying to end Australia's inhumane asylum seeker policies of offshore detention.

    Are you saying that Christians in particular should not speak about political issues? If religion shouldn't be brought into such issues, are you saying that the opinions of the "irreligious" are more valuable? If so, please tell me why William Wilberforce was wrong to act upon his faith.

    I would prefer to have all faiths speaking into the political dialogue than deny or have people withdraw from the discussion. I think that a plurality of views better represents society, which is the very point of democracy.
    Because historically, bringing faith into political discourse makes people very reluctant to compromise and often has them defending indefensible positions due to their faith. Yes, there are some cases where the unshakeable faith of a very religious person is helpful when fighting for a righteous cause against widespread opposition, but in the day to day buisness of politics, compromise and a willingness to change your opinion is vital, and neither of those things tend to go hand in hand with religion.
    You will come to a place where the streets are not marked. Some windows are lighted but mostly they're darked. A place you could sprain both your elbow and chin. Do you dare to stay out? Do you dare to go in? How much can you lose? How much can you win?
  • PresidentJokoPresidentJoko Seattle, WashingtonPosts: 23
    No. I identify as an agnostic atheist (though certain parts of deism are appealing).
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 5,022 ✭✭✭
  • fingerscrossedfingerscrossed MainePosts: 164 ✭✭
    Personally, I identify as Catholic and go to church almost every week. I'm a little surprised at the ratio on this poll though! We have a lot of non-religious people here. It's not bad, just interesting.
    There are only two kinds of people in the world: those who can extrapolate from incomplete data
  • NerdWriterFighterNerdWriterFighter HogwartsPosts: 167 ✭✭
    I am technically a Catholic but if I had a choice, I would consider myself to believe in God, but not be in a particular religion, or at least at the moment. I believe that God exists and I am still trying to figure out my own faith in God, but I don't believe in quite a few teachings of the church like gay marriage, premarital sex, and how the church acts against abortion.* I understand that there are a lot of great people in the church like Pope Francis, but there are also a lot of crazy conservative also. There might be another, more liberal denomination of Christianity that might please me when I get older, but right now I just am not categorizing myself into a religion.

    *not the idea of abortion being morally wrong, but the idea of outlawing abortion, thus allowing a black market for unsafe abortions. I am kind of undecided about weather abortion is right or wrong.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 5,022 ✭✭✭
    I would assume that believing in god and believing in the church are two different things.
    Otherwise very few catholics would believe in god after they (the church in italy) so actively tried to hinder science 4-500 years ago (due to contradictions between their word and scientific proof).

    As for abortion - I don't believe in god, and thus in my philosophy we're just smarter cattle. I don't mind abortion as long as it is safe.

  • TheCondescendingSealTheCondescendingSeal Geelong, Victoria, AustraliaPosts: 140 ✭✭
    I do NOT identify as a 'christian' or religious in the traditional sense.
    I honestly have no idea how people can read the Bible, say they want to live by what it says, and then go out and proceed to hate people who are different from them, saying that God hates them. I could partially understand it if the New Testament did not exist, but the New Testament makes it very clear that God doesn't hate anyone, even if they hate him. That's kinda the whole point of Jesus and all that...
    Someone being gay matters to God just as much as the white lie you told your boss the other day. He doesn't particularly like it, but he loves you anyway, and he's not gonna stop you from going to heaven if you accept his offer any more if you're gay.

    So, I'm not a 'christian', but I believe in a lot of what Christians say they believe in.
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  • TrishaTrisha Posts: 298
    I am Hindu, and I think Hinduism is very flexible and that's one of the reason I have never doubted my faith.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 5,022 ✭✭✭
    There's always room to change that

  • TrishaTrisha Posts: 298
    @NeiroAtOpelCc that's what I am saying, my belief changes but since Hinduism is flexible, it excepts anything I believe in. I can be atheist or monotheist or polytheist and agnostic and still be Hindu and no one can question my faith.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 5,022 ✭✭✭
    You by definition can't be atheist and theist at the same time.

  • TrishaTrisha Posts: 298
    I have freedom to interpret god however I feel right. According to some translation god in Hinduism is nothing but us humans, and according to some it's the whole universe , and many say the work you do is your god and also to a few a supernatural being is the god. If you think you find god in music and nowhere else, you are allowed to think that. So I can be a theist if I believe that I am God, or my mother is god and not believe in a GOD who is omnipotent which might translate to the fact that I am atheist. But you see I do believe in god but in a different form, and it's fine.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 5,022 ✭✭✭
    Atheist is not believing that there are any gods. It doesn't matter what powers said gods hold or which forms they take.
    I'm not saying your belief is wrong - but if you believe there is a god of sorts, then you are theist.

  • TrishaTrisha Posts: 298
    Yes I am theist, but I am saying that even if I become atheist I'll still be religious. Because that will be my way of interpreting the texts.
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