Are you religious?

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  • astralliciastrallici Posts: 8
    I was raised an orthodox christian, both my parents and all the relatives I know are except me and my two sisters, all of us are atheists even though we were raised christians. We all became atheists in our teens when we started thinking for ourselves and searching about religion, facts around it and science. The only thing is that atheists, even though the numbers of us are growing in the new generations, are viewed very badly in my country because most people are religious and they don't respect people that critisize their ideology.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭

    I was raised an orthodox christian, both my parents and all the relatives I know are except me and my two sisters, all of us are atheists even though we were raised christians. We all became atheists in our teens when we started thinking for ourselves and searching about religion, facts around it and science. The only thing is that atheists, even though the numbers of us are growing in the new generations, are viewed very badly in my country because most people are religious and they don't respect people that critisize their ideology.

    That reminds me of this video I saw earlier today. It doesn't appear acceptable that people are not religious - at least judging by that one video.


  • astralliciastrallici Posts: 8
    edited September 2016



    That reminds me of this video I saw earlier today. It doesn't appear acceptable that people are not religious - at least judging by that one video.

    I've seen the video and most of Jaclyn's content. That priest was an utter idiot but I would say that USA is a "heaven" (lol) for atheists in comparison to most European countries, especially the eastern ones. (Of course I'm talking about western societies, I can't even imagine the amount of fear atheists live under in islamic countries). In Greece where I'm from religion is taught in schools from the youngest age possible, brainwashing at its best, priests and churches have a TON of money, most of them are racist pigs that have said the worst about refugees and migrants, they protest against gays and they are very tight with the government. Leftish wing my ass...they said they'd cut the ties between the church and the government and now you see them kissing priests on the cheek. They push their religious agenda to people, we pay everything related to their religion (priests salary, electricity of churches, water, celebrations etc.) from our damn taxes and the churches themselves have tons of land, they make even more money from the people that visit the churches and they pay 0 taxes for everything.

    It's a shitshow man. And they talk about atheists like we're the ones with the lowest morals. Who? The priests that got caught concealing child molestation in their church operated orphanages. 3rd world country we are.

    by astrallici
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    Here in Denmark it's a bit better. The church tax is optional - although you're by default opted in. So theoretically you don't have to pay the church. You will in the end anyway though, as the state covers for the lost revenue in some way anyway.
    Also it's maybe more theoretical than practical. I've tried to 'quit the church' a few years ago, but I failed. You see, either the priest has to start responding to your emails, or you have to show up in person. I'm only showing up in a church if someone's dead or being married. I've never been inside the local church, and I don't want to be forced to just because some dude refuses to reply to his emails.

  • astralliciastrallici Posts: 8
    I'd be pissed off as well but if I were you I'd wear every piece of satanic merch I could find and pay that priest an unforgetable visit. They're all about money and spreading hate, no thank you.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    edited September 2016
    I don't care enough to spend money on it
    Ps your last comment is also spreading hate
    by NeiroAtOpelCc

  • astralliciastrallici Posts: 8
    Well I do hate their ideology and practices, I don't see something wrong with expressing my hate towards them. I can hate an ideology and their preachers, same way they can hate gay people or atheists, the only differences are the reasons behind that hate and whose actions actually have a negative affect on people's lives. Simple as that.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    I'd argue all hate is negative. For instance your posts may dissuade people who are religious from participating here. I don't believe that to have been the intent behind making this thread.

  • astralliciastrallici Posts: 8
    edited September 2016
    Hating an ideology is not equal to hating its people. There's a huge difference between priests and preachers and regular religious people. I'm sorry but my freedom of speech is more important than the feelings of people that get offended or scared of speaking up because someone disagrees with them, especially on the internet. (All hate is negative? I guess you don't support hating racism or nazism or fascism? They are ideologies as well. I find hate to be healthy when expressed in a healthy non violent way, we can't like everything and living in a world where opposites exist it is absolutely logical to feel hate towards something you yourself find hateful or catastrophical)
    by astrallici
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    In my opinion there is no such thing as healthy hate. Hate is one very extreme on a huge spectrum. The world isn't black and white. There isn't just hate and love. I'm no fan of nazism, but I don't hate it. Hate is reserved for the very most wicked of things, and I've not yet seen anything worth hating. I strongly dislike that isis ruins ancient buildings and symbols to get its point across, but I guess they just don't know any better way of accomplishing their goals.
    Also, still in my opinion, you can't hate something and still be objective. And I believe striving to be objective is the way to a better world.

  • astralliciastrallici Posts: 8
    You don't find nazism wicked enough to hate? I'm sorry but I find that extremely comical. Also ISIS doesn't just ruin ancient buildings, they rape, torture and murder people. Pretty good reasons to hate them. Yes the world isn't black and white, but taking the middle ground all the time is hypocritical.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    There are more than three positions. Anyway I don't feel like spending more of my time on this argument.

  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,883 ✭✭✭



    Hate. n.
    1. to dislike intensely or passionately;
    2. feel extreme aversion for or extreme hostility toward; detest:
    - OED3.

    Or perhaps to put it in terms that my late mum said:

    "Don't hate anything unless you genuinely want it dead".

    I entirely agree with everything that @astrallici has said because it's rational and logical.

    They are ideologies as well. I find hate to be healthy when expressed in a healthy non violent way, we can't like everything and living in a world where opposites exist it is absolutely logical to feel hate towards something you yourself find hateful or catastrophical)


    I absolutely want to see ISIS come to an end. I'd love to see all of its followers go home to their families and rebuild what they've destroyed. What is wrong with wanting to eliminate worldsuck?
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    Rollo said:


    I absolutely want to see ISIS come to an end. I'd love to see all of its followers go home to their families and rebuild what they've destroyed. What is wrong with wanting to eliminate worldsuck?

    You can't have both though - per the definition your mother has, you can't have the followers go home, as you'd prefer them dead :p

    Anyway, there's nothing wrong with eliminating worldsuck, but I do think there's something wrong with being actively biased. As in not trying to see things from more than one angle, and still believing your angle is right. I'm not defending terrorists, merely stating one of my philosophies. On the topic of my philosophies, another one is that you're not allowed to complain unless you've tried to do something about the issue first. And I can't honestly say I've tried to fix the isis issue, or the ttip issue, or really any of the current big issues in the world except for the drinking water issue.

  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,883 ✭✭✭
    another one is that you're not allowed to complain unless you've tried to do something about the issue first

    another one is that you're not allowed to complain unless you've tried to do something about the issue first

    How would you reconcile this to something like the extension of the franchise, or other rights issues?

    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    I don't understand the question

  • Luke_Earl_MolleLuke_Earl_Molle Earl of Peace Jefferson, IaPosts: 3,005 ✭✭✭✭
    I feel like I should explain why I answered no, because it is actually quite complicated. I am not engaged in any religion, I give all religions equal treatment, I consider them all equally, to a certain degree. There are things that are just insane, but most religions really stem from the same basic ideas. I think of religion for me as a way of looking more at the way people think than the way the world actually works but I can't discredit things I can't disprove. There are portions of most religions that actually make sense and it is obvious that all of them contain things that are not true. I look at religion as a beautiful facet of human life and I enjoy to think about the ways that religion has shaped our world, and in a great many ways it has stifled the progress of humanity but in other ways it has forged humanity ahead. There are many things to think about when it comes to religion and I like to think about things so thinking about religion is fun for me. I do not actively participate in any religions for the most part though I do go to the Christmas Eve pageant at my grandparent's church.
    I am the Duke of Earl, and I also am Earl For To and Of Peace
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,883 ✭✭✭

    I don't understand the question

    You said:

    another one is that you're not allowed to complain unless you've tried to do something about the issue first

    If you're not allowed to complain unless you've tried to do something about the issue first, then how are you supposed to do something about an issue if it first requires you to complain and voice an opinion?

    The extension of the franchise, and virtually all rights issues started out with people voicing complaints.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    Dependant on how and to whom you complain, I would under some circumstances accept that as actually doing something about it. For instance complaining about the cafeteria food by collecting signatures and presenting them to those in charge IS doing something. But complaining to me that my brother owes you money isn't, as you aren't expecting to change the situation with your action.
    I hope that clarifies my intent.

  • AkinaAkina Posts: 50

    In my opinion there is no such thing as healthy hate. Hate is one very extreme on a huge spectrum. The world isn't black and white. There isn't just hate and love. I'm no fan of nazism, but I don't hate it. Hate is reserved for the very most wicked of things, and I've not yet seen anything worth hating. I strongly dislike that isis ruins ancient buildings and symbols to get its point across, but I guess they just don't know any better way of accomplishing their goals.
    Also, still in my opinion, you can't hate something and still be objective. And I believe striving to be objective is the way to a better world.

    Outlawing any emotion seems like a losing battle, from my perspective. Pretty sure there's a sizeable body of psychological evidence to indicate it isn't particularly healthy either, though I don't have the time today to verify the original publications.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/insight-therapy/201009/emotional-acceptance-why-feeling-bad-is-good
    http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2015/05/17/how-to-stop-suffering-from-painful-emotions/

    Just because you feel the extremity of hate only under extreme circumstances, does not mean this is also the case for others.

    I agree that any emotion will interfere with a being's ability to be objective and that healthily resolving our emotions so that we are able to think objectively is critical to successfully seeking reality.

    I'm highly spiritual, but anti-religion (as in the kind that is prescribed for others). I didn't know which option to select.
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,883 ✭✭✭

    Hate is reserved for the very most wicked of things, and I've not yet seen anything worth hating.

    - Rape?
    - Murder?
    - Racism?
    - Sexism?
    - Theft?
    - Australia's refugee policy?
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    @Akina I never meant to outlaw emotions. But if you're able to envision how others think, it becomes very hard to hate their actions.

    I guess the same goes for Rollo's list.
    Rape is mostly hard to justify, but I can still imagine reasons for it being a legitimate psychological tactic in war (to uphold your troops moral and break that of resistance fighters). The other points are even easier to see justifications for. That doesn't mean I agree with the things happening nessecarily. But with that being said, I'd be hard pressed to see the harm in murdering Trump's buddy Putin.

  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,883 ✭✭✭

    Rape is mostly hard to justify, but I can still imagine reasons for it being a legitimate psychological tactic in war (to uphold your troops moral and break that of resistance fighters).

    I can not.



    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    Rollo said:

    I can not.

    Nothing I can do about that. Doesn't mean my opinion isn't valid though.

  • AkinaAkina Posts: 50

    @Akina I never meant to outlaw emotions. But if you're able to envision how others think, it becomes very hard to hate their actions.

    @NeiroAtOpelCc I had hoped that's not what you meant! :smile: I agree that when you take the time to empathize, sustaining hate becomes incredibly energy intensive.
  • NeiroAtOpelCcNeiroAtOpelCc Denmark (Als)Posts: 4,964 ✭✭✭
    Yeah. you said it more effectively there than I did though.

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