Latin

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Comments

  • NegativeNegative Posts: 5
    Utinam omnis discerent linguam Latinam. Ego discere 2 annis et Latinam amo! :)
    Quod 'Certamen' est?
  • kigakiga Posts: 6
    I think a big problem is that Latin is taught in a way that emphasizes declensions and conjugations, not as a way of real communication.  We do this because the people teaching Latin are conservative about their teaching styles and are not following the latest ideas in pedagogy, and because "everyone knows Latin is a dead language" so no one is thinking in terms of getting people speaking it fluently.

    While conversation is not a likely application of learning Latin, it *is* a good way to learn a language, dead or otherwise.  Those of you taking Latin, here is my challenge: pretend you are learning it to speak it on the street.  Speak in Latin to your friends who are in the class.  When you don't know a word, say it in English and then make a mental note to look it up in Latin later.  Gradually try to become fluent.

    The writer C.S. Lewis (who wrote the Narnia series) wrote a number of books on Christian spirituality.  One book, The Screwtape Letters, was translated into Italian, and an Italian priest, Giovanni Calabria, read it.  He wanted to write C.S. Lewis but knew no English.  So he wrote in a language he was sure any educated person (at the time) would know: Latin.  He started a wonderful conversation between two great thinkers.  These are available now as the Latin Letters of C.S. Lewis.  Giovanni Calabria was later canonized as a saint in the Catholic Church.  Google "Latin Letters C.S. Lewis".
  • IphigeniaIphigenia Posts: 9
    edited November 2012
    Oh my god I'm honestly shocked so many people hate it. I LOVE LATIN. I did it for years in university and I still use it in my studies today, and it gives me a great advantage in my research. Who needs to rely on the translations of others? Not this guy. 

    Plus, there's just no way to hate latin when you're translating Catullus or Virgil. 

    Also I don't get why so many want to speak latin. It's not a language to be spoken, there's not even any js... Like, there is literally no way to know how it was pronounced, so you can just pick any type of enunciation and you're perfectly valid. 
    by Iphigenia
  • WietskeWietske NetherlandsPosts: 357 ✭✭
    edited November 2012
    Iphigenia said:
    Oh my god I'm honestly shocked so many people hate it. I LOVE LATIN. I did it for years in university and I still use it in my studies today, and it gives me a great advantage in my research. Who needs to rely on the translations of others? Not this guy. 

    Plus, there's just no way to hate latin when you're translating Catullus or Virgil. 

    Also I don't get why so many want to speak latin. It's not a language to be spoken, there's not even any js... Like, there is literally no way to know how it was pronounced, so you can just pick any type of enunciation and you're perfectly valid. 

    I have translated Catullus and I did not like it at all. I don't like his work. I prefer Ovidius methamorphoses or Seneca's work. I have translated Vergilius.. His work is nice. Sometimes I like Latin, but other times I hate it.
    by Wietske
  • BelisariusBelisarius Posts: 314 ✭✭✭
    @Iphigenia Do I sense a fellow classicist? 

    Vergil is definitely one of my favourite Classical Latin authors.
  • IphigeniaIphigenia Posts: 9
    @Wietske ;
    But it's so funny! Reading out translations in class was always a hoot, especially Catullus 16. 

    Naturally! I won't be pursuing an MA or PhD, not in classics anyways, but I'm working on my Honours degree right now. How about yourself? Are you going into academics? I could honestly talk abou Vergil for hours. You can't understand how truly beautiful it is unless you translate and parse it yourself, then you can see how every single word is selected so carefully in order to fit. God, the flow of the words are even chosen in such a way to reflect what's going on! The swaying vowels during ocean scenes, the use of consonants and cacophonous words in battle scenes, it's just... so freaking beautiful. 
  • BelisariusBelisarius Posts: 314 ✭✭✭
    @Iphigenia I just finished a Master's degree in classical archaeology actually, but now I am taking a year off before heading back to pursue a PhD. Unfortunately, my area of expertise isn't very Latin-heavy, but my years of study definitely come in handy nonetheless! 
  • IphigeniaIphigenia Posts: 9
    @Belisarius Oh wow, congrats! What was your thesis on? 
  • BelisariusBelisarius Posts: 314 ✭✭✭
    @Iphigenia Well, the title was "From Diocletian to Maurice: an archaeological analysis of late antique defensive strategy along the Lower Danube between 284 and 602". 

    Sounds thrilling, I know.
  • IphigeniaIphigenia Posts: 9
    edited November 2012
    @Belisarius I'm not into archaeology too much, but yay warfare! And omg, I feel your pain. Trying to explain the paper you're writing to anyone who isn't doing classics is futile because it's impossible trying to not make it seem like a waste of time. I've written about the use of one word before. 

    But it was thrilling. ;__; 
    by Iphigenia
  • MrYamokMrYamok Bologna, ItalyPosts: 26
    Hi, I'm currently studying Latin in High school and I'm at my last year. I can't really say that Iove it, but I think it's a very interesting language.
    Besides, I also kind of think of it as something to preserve, since I live in Italy, motherland of Latin.
    I'm more interested in Roman history, even though I love Catullo's poems. The clean ones, of course.
  • MyrtoMyrto Posts: 131 ✭✭
    We do latin at school because I live in Greece (we also do ancient greek) but we're too focused on grammar and we are doing extracts from various writers but they're not the actual things they wrote.. Anyway it's really interesting :) 
  • ElizabethElizabeth Posts: 368 ✭✭
    I'm homeschooled and I've been taking Latin on and off since 2nd grade (some years I've taken Spanish instead.) My mom started teaching me without knowing much about it herself but she is so fluent now she's teaching it at a local private school. I do a little coding and I always wanted to code a Latin translation practice app, where you'd learn some vocab and syntax and also have opportunities to translate the Latin greats. I've studied from the Henle textbooks and prior to that the Mars Hill Latin Grammar books. I have some Catholic friends who I like to talk about Latin with, especially ecclesiastical vs classical differences. Latin has helped me understand English grammar and vocab quite well, as well as any Romance language, most of which I at least dabble in.
  • LucyisaliveLucyisalive Posts: 68 ✭✭
    I've always really wished I could learn Latin! As it is the only Latin I know is Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus (I assume that's Latin - correct me if I'm wrong.)

    'To love another person is to see the face of God' - Les Miserablés 

    'There's some good in this world... and it's worth fighting for' - The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers.  

    'This is why I love books... they jump into the abyss to be with you.' - John Green

  • VickiVicki Posts: 2,905 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2013
    Salve!

    I'm working towards a Latin GCSE  two Latin GCSE's as a school extra-curricular. I do two lunchtimes a week, and have been doing so since September. My Latin is a bit rudimentary at the moment, but it will improve. I chose to do Latin because I went to a very catholic primary school, where we sang a lot of Latin hymns, and I've always wanted to know what they meant. I enjoy it, partly because it's entirely up to me if I do it or not. We dabble with the Cambridge course, but it mostly my teacher's tangents on things like Nero's sexuality that make it interesting. I agree with the point on the teacher, because I think our teacher and his tangent's make Latin really enjoyable, but I know that other people in my class think that his tangents are annoying - they just "need" Latin for things like archaeology. 

    by Vicki
    "This is not words. This is just squiggles on a page.This is notation." - Vi Hart
    I reside in the land of the last ones. 

  • BelisariusBelisarius Posts: 314 ✭✭✭
    Vicki said:
     - they just "need" Latin for things like archaeology. 

    @Vicki Classical archaeology, I assume? 
  • geekacrossthestreetgeekacrossthestreet Posts: 166 ✭✭✭
    One of my main goals for the year is to try and learn Latin. I have some experience with Catullus and Virgil and several Latin insult books. Does anyone know a Latin textbook that isn't terribly expensive?
  • VickiVicki Posts: 2,905 ✭✭✭✭
    @Belisarius: I presume ... I never actually asked ...  
    "This is not words. This is just squiggles on a page.This is notation." - Vi Hart
    I reside in the land of the last ones. 

  • BelisariusBelisarius Posts: 314 ✭✭✭
    @Vicki Sorry, I should explain - I've done both Classics and archaeology, and never had to do Latin for the latter, so I was curious whether this had changed recently. 

    @geekacrossthestreet The textbook I used during my undergraduate degree was Wheelock's Latin - although I'm not sure whether it falls into your definition of not "terribly expensive". It's a pretty decent beginner's textbook, with plenty of other supporting material if you want that as well, and I certainly liked it.
  • geekacrossthestreetgeekacrossthestreet Posts: 166 ✭✭✭
  • I'm only in Latin I, but I love it so much. I love how our class can quickly jump from distinguishing naves from navis to random mythology, or Roman culture, or anything like that. The class is just that much cooler, because it's not just a language course.
    I'm Lauren. I'm 15. I like to write, and make films, and stuff. Let's be friends.
  • WietskeWietske NetherlandsPosts: 357 ✭✭
    edited February 2013
    Iphigenia said:
    @Wietske ;
    But it's so funny! Reading out translations in class was always a hoot, especially Catullus 16. 

    Naturally! I won't be pursuing an MA or PhD, not in classics anyways, but I'm working on my Honours degree right now. How about yourself? Are you going into academics? I could honestly talk abou Vergil for hours. You can't understand how truly beautiful it is unless you translate and parse it yourself, then you can see how every single word is selected so carefully in order to fit. God, the flow of the words are even chosen in such a way to reflect what's going on! The swaying vowels during ocean scenes, the use of consonants and cacophonous words in battle scenes, it's just... so freaking beautiful. 
    We didn't translate that one.. :( I think we only did his boring work.
    by Wietske
  • XearXear Posts: 1
    Salve amici! Quid agitis?
    Linguam latinam in scolam studui, sed nunc tempum non habeo.
  • actrealactreal Posts: 13
    I studied Latin for 6 years in high school but I keep my eye in by helping translate mottos into Latin on the internet, reading bits of Harrius Potter et Philosophi Lapis and other bits and pieces.


  • VickiVicki Posts: 2,905 ✭✭✭✭
    So, I'm trying to translate DFTBA into latin for something, and I've ended up with "nolite dedisco horribilius esse", but it just looks wrong. It's probably because the meaning of awesome has changed somewhat, and I wonder if there would be a better way of putting it? Also, I think dedisco needs a different ending, but I've gone blank. Any help would be great. 
    "This is not words. This is just squiggles on a page.This is notation." - Vi Hart
    I reside in the land of the last ones. 

  • actrealactreal Posts: 13
    As you say, horribilius does not mean the same thing in Latin as awesome does in current English.  I like mirus (wonderful, strange, remarkable, amazing, surprising, extraordinary) as the closest Latin cognate I can find.

    Nolite
    should be followed by the infinitive so you need dediscere there.  However, two infinitives in a sentence sounds clunky, so I'd suggest the prohibitive imperative, like so:

    Ne dedisce mirus esse
  • sonicscrewdriver42sonicscrewdriver42 Nerdfighteria IslandPosts: 32
    Noli Oblivisci Mirabilis Esse!
  • coolcat3699coolcat3699 Sydenham, LondonPosts: 144 ✭✭
    LOVE LATIN!!! i dont see why everyone thinks it is so useless when it helps with so many other languages
    who cares if no one speqks it anymore; it helps learn other languaes :-D
    dead languages ftw
  • Floo_Powder_PowerFloo_Powder_Power GallifreyPosts: 86 ✭✭
    Salvete amicis!
    Latin is great :D I've just started this year, but so far I love it!
  • HastingsHastings Posts: 24
    Salvete omnes! 

    I am studying Latin at my uni for my B.A. language requirements, and I am absolutely loving it! I have only taken one semester of it so far (I'm a freshman at uni, the fall semester that just recently ended was my first semester of uni), but I am already noticing improvements in my English grammar skills and my ability to learn other languages (I'm a big fan of Duolingo, I use it to gradually improve my Spanish [my Spanish is atrocious, but I took 3 years of it in High School, and I live in Texas so I feel like I should work on improving it], and I am also using Duolingo to experiment with learning German). After hearing horror stories from people I've met who've also taken Latin, I am extremely glad that I am using Wheelock's, because Wheelock's Latin is the most amazing textbook I've ever had the pleasure of using.
    "Then we have found, as it seems, that the many beliefs of the many about what's fair and about the other things roll around somewhere between not-being and being purely and simply." -Plato: Republic

    Semper discens sum, de vita, de mundo, de omnibus, vivo et vivens amo!
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