Latin

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  • HastingsHastings Posts: 24
    edited January 2014
    Vicki said:
     I agree with the point on the teacher, because I think our teacher and his tangent's make Latin really enjoyable, but I know that other people in my class think that his tangents are annoying - they just "need" Latin for things like archaeology. 
    The tangents we go off on in my Latin class are really what make the class (and learning the language to some extent) so enjoyable. My professor seems particularly prone to going off on tangents, especially if other members of the class start contributing to what he's talking about. 
    Example: One day I walked into class and the professor had this on screen:
    image

    by Hastings
    "Then we have found, as it seems, that the many beliefs of the many about what's fair and about the other things roll around somewhere between not-being and being purely and simply." -Plato: Republic

    Semper discens sum, de vita, de mundo, de omnibus, vivo et vivens amo!
  • daeiribudaeiribu Posts: 99 ✭✭
    edited March 2014
    Salvete, omnes!
    Linguae Latinae medium anni studui. Non multum recordor. Sed in hac lingua loqui (scribere) multum amo.
    by daeiribu

  • coreysomethingcoreysomething Taipei, TaiwanPosts: 8
    Necnullos Latine colloqui temptavisse videre miror!
    Sed iam colloquium tam mortuum quam Lingua ipsa Latina videtur.
    O misera mea!
    "Seek simplicity, and distrust it."

    -A. N. Whitehead
  • THE_MONGOLSTHE_MONGOLS KING OF EVERYTHING ULANBAATARPosts: 323 ✭✭✭
    IRRUMABO TEXAS TE

    IRRUMABO SOLA STELLA BERSABEE
    NOBODY STARTS A LAND WAR IN ASIA AND WINS UNLESS YOU ARE... WAIT FOR IT... THE MONGOLS!
    WE'RE THE EXCEPTION!
    https://twitter.com/TheMongols_


  • coreysomethingcoreysomething Taipei, TaiwanPosts: 8
    Sicut decet barbaris agere. :D

    Mihi necesse significationem quaesivisse verbi 'Bersabee' fuit. Id vere vocabulum rarum est!
    "Seek simplicity, and distrust it."

    -A. N. Whitehead
  • Slave!
    I'm taking Latin this year in school, but I don't know much yet. I'm not quite a through the first quarter. Do you guys have any tips or tricks for studying Latin?
  • coreysomethingcoreysomething Taipei, TaiwanPosts: 8
    edited October 2016
    *Salve
    Ah, autocorrect, my ancient enemy...

    I'm glad you asked! I have a bit of advice I can share.

    1. Don't let the way the language is commonly taught discourage you.
    Most objections to/complaints about the Latin language I've heard are fundamentally problems with the way it's taught. Yes, it's a little complicated. It's a highly inflected language, with 7 noun/adjective cases, 4 distinct verb conjugations, a slew of tenses, AND some significantly screwy grammatical constructions. Remembering all of these things is difficult, and to help students remember, teachers often will have students memorize chart after chart, formula after formula, and hope that their students can use these formulae to extract the meaning, kicking and screaming, out of primary sources. This kind of learning isn't ideal for all kinds of learners.

    If you have a difficult time remembering all the cases and their terminations, don't worry. It takes time and patience. Studying the charts can help you get there, but there's something else you can do:

    2. Study Latin like you would any other language.
    I mentioned the complexity of the Latin language above in brief. It needs to be noted, though, that English is itself both difficult and inflected, and yet people can learn and communicate with it in the same way that people learned and communicated with Latin for more than a millennium: by speaking it with a community. I don't want to make it seem like this way is all rainbows and koalas. It presents definite challenges, but I would remind you that learning a language is one of the most complicated things we do as humans, and we undertake that task at our squishiest. You can summon a superpower that's older than your own personal narrative to internalize all of those difficult-to-memorize details. From there, attaching the names to the cases and tenses is a simple affair. Isn't that wonderful?!

    Now, I realize that this may seem a little crazy, and maybe it is. You'll hear a lot of 'but Latin's a dead language' and the like if you insist on practicing this way. I frame these as opportunities for interesting discussions. If you want to give studying this way a try, I'd recommend Hans Ørberg's 'Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata' as a starting point. Also, YouTube is amazing. Use that.

    Whatever your preferred method, good luck! I hope this was at least a little helpful.
    by coreysomething
    "Seek simplicity, and distrust it."

    -A. N. Whitehead
  • Thank you Corey, that was very helpful!
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