All the Deepness

Hiya!

For me, the main role of literature is not only to philosophize about the human experiment but to represent a view of the universe as a whole. So, as a part of the book that I'm currently writing, I'm collecting what people think about deep subjects. So please tell me what you think about life, the universe, and everything! Keep in mind, no judgements, only curious and genuine discussion.

Here's some questions to consider if you need help. Pick something that interests you and run with it:

1. What do you think happened before the big bang? Has the universe always been here, or was it created, or did it spontaneously come about?
2. Do you think there's anything beyond what we can ever understand? Is attempting to grasp such a thing a worthy pursuit?
3. What is the most important thing in your life? What would you die for? What would you live for?
4. Are humans generally good or generally bad? Or are they neutral until their environment shapes them?
5. Do you think free will exists? If so, where does it come from, considering both nature (genetics) and nurture (environment) are usually understood as deterministic? If not, do you think we can ever make peace with not having free will?
6. Why do you think that people usually shy away from deep questions and existential worries, considering that they are a natural part of life?

Really, anything you want to talk about is cool. Just tell me what is important for your understanding of things :smile:

Comments

  • Gara_the_engineerGara_the_engineer In a log house at the edge of the forestPosts: 621 ✭✭✭
    edited June 28
    2. I think some are beyond actual understanding, things like dark matter or quantum physics. We can however "understand" the simpler ways of explaining them, and we can definitely use our theoretical "understanding" of it to calculate stuff that's useful to us. But it's kind of like grasping the concept of "infinite". We know in theory what it is, it's extremely simple. But we can never ever imagine something truly without edges, without borders, without an end somewhere. When we think of something infinitely big, we just picture something huge. But "huge" has an end, an edge somewhere. "Infinite" doesn't ever have that. So yeah, we will never be able to understand "infinite". But we sure can use the concept in math and physics, and the closer our understanding of it is to the actual reality of it, the better we can understand how to use it.
    3. I wouldn't die for anything, because I have one much more important thing that I have to live for: my husband. I think love in general is the thing that can drive me very far in what I'm willing to do for my loved ones, but I'm never ever going to risk making my husband a widower.
    4. I'd say that humans are in general both good and bad, rather than being neutral. We do affect people around us, and no person is a saint who never does anything that might hurt another (physically or mentally) but very few people in this world are purely loves-to-inflict-pain-and-will-take-every-chance kind of evil either. We hurt that annoying and incredibly stupid colleague when we finally have enough of their incompetence and tell them to "shut up and think, for once", and we support and help that lovely friend of ours when they had a bad day at work. Our everyday actions contain both things that we don't really feel very proud of and things that'll make someone else's day better. I think that our realistic goal should be to do more good in this world than bad, and call that enough. We can strive to do a bit more good than we already do, but we can never do everything good and nothing bad. (And we should still try to avoid being mean to that colleague, or at least apologise thoroughly after having done that)
    5. Uh, dunno really. But we can't really sit down and refuse to do anything "because everything is already determined anyway". Our actions can still make a difference, no matter whether they're predetermined or not.
    6. Ugh. Brain. Hurts.

    I can probably elaborate some of it if you have specific questions. I don't know if it is of interest to know where one's thoughts comes from, but being a marine engineer makes me be more interested in usefulness and outcomes and such than in marvelling at the incomprehensibility of the universe.
    by Gara_the_engineer
    The meaning of life is to give life a meaning
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