Vulcan death grip.

Tamer_Of_PuffsTamer_Of_Puffs Melbourne, Australia. Posts: 25
how exactly could I do a vulcan death grip? Im not going to go around using it on other people, but would it be possible?
Look up at the stars, not down at your feet.
-Stephen Hawking.

Comments

  • JMcKJMcK 51.44°N, 0.33°WPosts: 36
    If it is, I never learned it in any martial art, nor in the military. Even were it possible, it's impractical against an opponent who is resisting.
    Never fear to be kind, but never confuse kindness with ego.
  • Tamer_Of_PuffsTamer_Of_Puffs Melbourne, Australia. Posts: 25
    It would not be the same as the one used on the show, but im sure there are some real world nerve pinches.
    Look up at the stars, not down at your feet.
    -Stephen Hawking.
  • JMcKJMcK 51.44°N, 0.33°WPosts: 36
    Within a nerve there are fibres. Some fibres run up to the brain, others run down to the body, and each is specialised to convey specific data. Downward fibres carry motor commands. Upward fibres carry pain or temperature or proprioception. This is all they do.

    A nerve is not like a copper wire, banish that notion! Signals cannot travel down the up fibre nor up the down fibre. The synapse, the chemically-mediated junction between nerve cells, is unidirectional. Only one nerve cell can send a chemical signal across the synapse and only the other can receive that signal. The electrical signal only occurs within a cell and does not jump between cells. For example: your motor nerves don't tell you where your hand is, your proprioceptive nerves do. Likewise it is the sensory cortex and not the motor cortex which knows from this sensation of where your hand is.

    A pinch on a motor fibre could hypothetically inhibit the use of a given limb or part of a limb. Please note that nerves leave the spine to innervate a specific organ or set of organs, so a nerve in the left shoulder is only running to and from the left arm. Pinching a nerve in the left shoulder won't affect the right arm, nor either leg.

    A pinch on a sensory fibre could hypothetically induce pain signals to the brain. Going with the left shoulder again: you would tell the brain that the left arm is in a ton of pain. This is the more likely scenario as a signal to the brain could hypothetically affect neighbouring regions et cetera if it generated enough impulses that something "bled over" (unlikely).

    So we've pinched the left shoulder, let's say we got the brachial plexus. This connects to the motor and sensory cortexes in the parietal lobe of the brain, one of the medial structures. We'll look at the sensory in particular as signals cannot travel up the down fibre. Areas adjacent to the sensory cortex are the sensory association area and the motor cortex. Also the taste area. Maybe a nerve pinch would cause you to twitch and jerk, or maybe even to synaesthetically "taste" things.

    The areas responsible for consciousness and vital life processes are on the extremes of the brain, much removed from the parietal lobe. It's not happening. To make it "bleed over" by that much, and strongly enough to render unconscious or to kill, you'd have to squeeze the nerve so hard that its corresponding cerebral cortex generated as much energy as a lightning strike. Nerves work in millivolts, not megavolts; the human body cannot generate that sort of power.

    The most a nerve pinch can do is send "electric shocks" from a nerve (try manipulating your ulnar nerve at the elbow. If you do it right, you'll know ;) ) or dull sensation or motor commands in the part of the limb below the pinch. That's all the power that it can generate. Nothing more is going to happen.

    Source: am postgrad biologist, got consistent firsts in human and animal physiology.
    Never fear to be kind, but never confuse kindness with ego.
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