Math!

Hello fellow Nerdfighters!

I have several Math questions and I can't seem to find anyone who can answer them. To be clear, I don't need help with homework. These are questions like, does the closed-form solution to pi exist? Big questions for things that were not taught in school. I was hoping to ask them here, or get in touch with a mathematician. Your help is always appreciated. Thank you for your time.

Respectfully,
nasasempai

Best Answers

Answers

  • lilwritergirllilwritergirl Posts: 13
    I don't know about closed-form solutions, but if you haven't already I suggest watching some videos from Vsauce, especially 'how to count past infinity' and 'The Banach–Tarski Paradox'. He walks his viewers through really difficult concepts in an entertaining way.
    Also, there are lots of physics forums around, and if you tried a couple of those I bet you could find someone willing to help.
    Good luck!
  • nasasempainasasempai Posts: 5
    Thank you lilwritergirl. Do you recommend any physics forums in particular?
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,905 ✭✭✭

    These are questions like, does the closed-form solution to pi exist?

    This:

    π = c / 2 x r

    Highly tractable.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • nasasempainasasempai Posts: 5
    Thank you for your input Rollo, but I am not satisfied. The definition of pi, is well, just a definition - theoretically perfect. But How do you actually calculate that perfect value?
  • MichkovMichkov Posts: 105 ✭✭
    The problem with pi is that it's irrational, ie it goes on forever. There is no perfect value just more and more accurate ones. Frankly everything beyond 3.1415 isn't going to have much impact on most calculations.

    Rollos definition is perfectly valid, though you are going to run out of time/memory if you insist on finding the "perfect value".
  • nasasempainasasempai Posts: 5
    Thank you for your input Michkov. I realize that pi is irrational. However, perhaps there is an expression that can perfectly represent such an irrational quantity - a closed-from expression.
  • RolloRollo Operative 6081, MiniTrue Airstrip Three, OceaniaPosts: 1,905 ✭✭✭

    Thank you for your input Michkov. I realize that pi is irrational. However, perhaps there is an expression that can perfectly represent such an irrational quantity - a closed-from expression.



    π = c / 2 x r

    By defnition a "closed-form" expression is one that can be expressed in a finite number of operations.

    What I gave you has 2 operations - multiplication and division. 2 is a finite number.

    QED: Pi although irrational has a closed-form expression to describe it.
    "I speak an infinite deal of nothing and I am not bound to please thee with my answers."

    I've written four books - you might like to buy them: Linky - Doobly Doo
  • FawkesTEARFawkesTEAR Posts: 1
    can we change this thread into just a thread on cool math stuff? Or does that exist elsewhere, and I can't find it?
  • GurgesGurges Posts: 1
    I'm always down for cool math stuff.

    I am a bit baffled by this idea that "pi=c/2r" thing, though, considering that both of the quantities are undefined variables that require empirical measurement to be useful, and as such will never be as precise as an actual mathematical definition of the quantity at hand.
  • rachelhydrogenrachelhydrogen CanadaPosts: 3
    I'm set to cry I love math
  • MichkovMichkov Posts: 105 ✭✭
    Gurges said:

    I'm always down for cool math stuff.

    I am a bit baffled by this idea that "pi=c/2r" thing, though, considering that both of the quantities are undefined variables that require empirical measurement to be useful, and as such will never be as precise as an actual mathematical definition of the quantity at hand.

    Math doesn't rely on empirical measurements though, you are going about it the wrong way. You work the problem out in a rigerous abstract sense and then apply it to the empirical world
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